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Kaelon Fox. Photo by Chet White, UK Athletics. Kaelon Fox. Photo by Chet White, UK Athletics.
By Brent Ingram

As a freshman, Kentucky utilized Kaelon Fox in just about every position on the field except goalkeeper.

Now, entering his sophomore season, UK head coach Johan Cedergren is hoping that a firm positional role for Fox will help the standout from Louisville's St. Xavier High School.

A 6-foot-2, 155-pounder, Fox is firmly entrenched as a center back, alongside 6-foot-3 sophomore Jordan Wilson. The duo helps the Wildcats boast the potential for a dynamic defensive squad, with outside back Charlie Reymann also in his second year as an everyday starter.

As a freshman, Fox started eight games and played in 19 of UK's 20 games, totaling two goals and one assist, firing 29 shots. He saw starts on the backline, in the midfield and as an attacking player.

"I learned that college soccer is a difficult game," Fox said. "Coming in as a true defender and having to play forward, midfield and some defense last year, it gave me more knowledge how certain players move on and off the ball, how forwards move on and off the ball. It gave me more of an insight into how to properly defend those attacking players. It developed me more as a center back."

Fox netted his first career goal at Xavier, before adding a tally in UK's win over Florida Atlantic. He also added an assist vs. IPFW and had at least four shots in four games, including a six-shot effort vs. South Carolina.

After spending the spring playing on the backline with Wilson and Reymann, the three have formed a solid chemistry. With UK sophomore Alex Bumpus suffering a season-ending injury in the offseason, it means that the backline will feature a new face at the outside back position opposite Reymann.

"It is really good to have chemistry between your backline, because if you don't things can break down and that is not what you want from your back four and your keeper. Jordan, Charlie and I, the chemistry between us on and off the field is great. It just comes down to having each other's back on the field. When Jordan or Charlie steps up in the attack, we have the ability to cover for them. If someone gets beat off the ball, having their back there. I know Jordan and Charlie have my back. It is a great comfort feeling knowing we are there for each other."

With the backline supported by three veteran starters and a goalkeeper that Cedergren considers "one of the three best goalkeepers in the country" in Callum Irving, Kentucky will be anchored by its defending unit.

"Johan tells us that defense wins championships," Fox said. "That is a true statement. Having chemistry on the backline is great. Jordan, Charlie and I played the whole spring together on the backline which helped us with the chemistry. The defense that we have this year can be really great. We just have to keep building on it game after game."

While his defense will be a strength on the 2014 roster, Cedergren is going to count on Fox and Wilson to provide some scoring threats on set pieces with their size, physicality and athleticism.

"It is going to be pretty important," Fox said about the backline coming up on set pieces. "Johan wants our center backs to get four or five set-piece goals. We need to get our goals-per game up a little bit."

Kentucky opens its 2014 season Friday at 7 p.m. at Wright State. The Wildcats will debut the sparkling new Wendell & Vickie Bell Soccer Complex on Sunday with a twinbill with the women's soccer program, with UK taking on Belmont at 5 p.m.


Celis ready to take next step

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Bryan Celis. Photo by Photo by Britney Howard, UK Athletics Bryan Celis. Photo by Photo by Britney Howard, UK Athletics
By Brent Ingram

Kentucky's 2014 men's soccer team features four upperclassmen on a youthful roster with high hopes for the upcoming season.

Because of the nature of the roster, those four upperclassmen will be counted on to shoulder a large share of the leadership burden.

Among them is junior midfielder Bryan Celis, a talented product of Houston's Mayde Creek High School.

Celis enters his junior season after starring in the midfield for the Wildcats the last two seasons. Celis is coming off a sophomore campaign that was limited to 12 starts due to injury. Despite missing time, Celis totaled three assists, including a pass that set up on the game-winning goal in the season opener vs. Georgia State.

A 5-foot-8, 159 pounder, Celis stepped right into the UK lineup as a freshman in 2012, helping pace the Wildcats back to the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2003. Celis played in all 21 games in his collegiate debut, with 11 starts as an attacking midfielder and forward. Celis finished with a goal and four assists. His four assists ranked second on the club.

"Coming in my freshman year I didn't know what to expect," Celis said. "I didn't know much about college soccer so it was all basically new to me. Now that I've spent three years here, I've learned a lot, how to manage my time with school and soccer, what to expect on and off the field, being a leader, being one of the older guys, and having to teach the young guns how things are done around here."

Celis joined the UK roster after a standout prep career in Houston. He saw time on the US U-17, U-15 and U-14 national teams, while TopDrawerSoccer.com ranked him as the 75th-best player in the class. He also saw time with the Dallas Texans in the US Soccer Development Academy.

"We all come from different backgrounds and different playing styles," Celis said. "Johan (Cedergren) really looks up to players the come from MLS academy teams. Me being one of them, he knows that I know the right things to do on and off the field. He believes that I can be a huge leader in the team and he wants me to teach the other guys how to overcome some of the obstacles that they are going to face and tell them to keep working hard and always being there for them and helping them play at 100 percent."

An obvious strength of the Kentucky squad entering 2014 is its defense, which is led by preseason All-Conference USA goalkeeper Callum Irving. Irving will help anchor the backline, along with talented returning starters Jordan Wilson, Charlie Reymann and Kaelon Fox.

"Having Callum back this year is going to be a great help to us," Celis said. "Cally has been with the Vancouver Whitecaps training all summer. Having Jordan, Fox and Cally back there is going to be a good help this year just because we all played together last year. We are a little bit more familiar with each other and our strengths and weaknesses. And same in the midfield with Kristoffer (Tollefsen), we all know how we play, we all know our strengths and we try to play towards our strengths so we are not exposed and vulnerable against teams."

As Kentucky gets ready for the 2014 season, one dominant storyline is the debut season of the sparkling new Wendell & Vickie Bell Soccer Complex.

"We are really excited," Celis said about opening up the new stadium. "I am sure I am speaking for everybody, we got the help through Mitch Barnhart and others who were kind enough to donate money to the stadium. New team, new training facilities, everything has us excited to get back to the season and start playing again. That is pretty much what we came here to do, is play soccer."

Kentucky opens its 2014 season on Friday at Wright State at 7 p.m. in Dayton, Ohio. UK will then debut the Bell Complex on Sunday at 5 p.m. vs. Belmont.

Video: Men's soccer media day press conference

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Junior goalkeeper Callum Irving was named first-team All-Conference USA in 2013. (Chet White, of UK Athletics, took this photo) Junior goalkeeper Callum Irving was named first-team All-Conference USA in 2013. (Chet White, of UK Athletics, took this photo)
It is common that good goalkeepers don't hit their peak until their late 20s, early 30s.

It is a position that require vocal leadership, quick thinking and a mature physical presence.

In his third season in between the pipes for the Kentucky men's soccer team, Callum Irving is developing into one of the best goalkeepers in college soccer.

Coming off a first-team All-Conference USA season as a sophomore, Irving enters the 2014 season with high hopes of taking the next step in his development, while helping lead the Wildcats back to the NCAA Tournament after a one-year absence.

With a stated goal of allowing 18 goals or less on the year, Irving and the Wildcats have high hopes for a strong defensive unit. With a back four featuring returning starters Jordan Wilson and Kaelon Fox at center back and Charlie Reymann at outside back, the strength of the UK roster appears to be in its defense.

Part of a strong defensive unit involves a vocal leader in goal, a role that Irving is embracing as a third-year standout.

"It is massive to be a vocal goalkeeper," Irving said. "As a keeper I have to be loud and commanding because I can see everything on the field. I need to be able to help guys out whenever I can. They also need to be able to let me know when I am doing things wrong or when I need to help them in certain areas. The communication with me, and not just the backline but with the entire team, is really important to keep things cohesive."

A 6-foot-1, 190-pounder, Irving has been tabbed a team captain for the 2014 season, with UK third-year head coach Johan Cedergren employing a leadership council.

"It's a real honor," Irving said about being a team captain. "It is something I've wanted to do for a while. I am just happy that I have been able to be put in a position to be one of the leaders on this team. It is a big challenge with such a young squad but the guys have a lot of respect for each other and I think they respect me as a player and a person. I look forward to being able to share some of the tougher situations I've been through as a junior player and help the freshmen get past that learning curve so they can all have a good impact on our season."

In 2013, Irving entered the season as the backup to senior co-captain Jack Van Arsdale. Van Arsdale shined in 2012 after earning the job midway through the season. Irving moved into the starting role for the final 13 games of 2013, totaling 16 starts on the year and allowing 18 goals in 1484 minutes. He finished with a 1.09 goals-against average, the 11th-best total in program history, with his six shutouts ranking ninth.

Irving was voted by the league coaches to the C-USA first-team in 2013, marking the second first-team all-conference goalkeeper in UK history and the first since Andy Gruenebaum in 2005.

Irving enters 2014 having transformed his body and benefiting greatly from two years of experience for the Wildcats.  

"Naturally I have physically matured quite a bit, putting on 30 pounds since my freshman year," Irving said. "Other than the physicality, it is just about being through different game scenarios. Being down, letting in own goals, making saves, there are a bunch of different scenarios that you go through and you learn from. For a keeper every game is a learning experience. Having a bunch of reps and having some game time has really helped me understand a lot of different scenarios, especially when it comes to college soccer, because it is a real different game from youth soccer. Being able to start leading the team has helped me mature and made me more calm at the back and have an expectation of what's going to come."

One of the keys to Irving's development has been the individual instruction from third-year goalkeeping coach David Casper.

"It has helped a ton," Irving said about his relationship with Casper. "It is great that we have a goalie coach that works with us every day. He puts in a ton of work on and off the field. He is one guy that is never satisfied, which is the best thing. Even if I had a good game, he will congratulate me, but we are still focused on the things that I did wrong in the game. He helps to keep me humble and keep me focused on always getting better and not being satisfied. No matter what he has always had my back. He is pretty big in getting me where I am."

As a freshman, Irving came in as a highly touted recruit out of Vancouver, British Columbia. In a preseason battle with Van Arsdale, Irving won the starting job for the season lidlifter at Dayton. He allowed four goals in a 4-3 loss but made six saves on 15 shots, making several jaw-dropping saves that left glimpses of his raw abilities.

Van Arsdale started the next two games before Irving returned to the starting lineup in Cedergren's first career win, posting a clean sheet vs. St. Joe's.  After starting vs. No. 4 Charlotte and allowing a first-half tally, Irving gave way in the second half to Van Arsdale. The next game sparked a season turn around for the Wildcats, as Van Arsdale turned in a heroic effort in leading UK to a win at No. 18 Louisville, securing the starting job for the remainder of 2012, with UK earning an NCAA Tournament hosting berth.

"I learned how to bounce back from failure and realize that not everything is going to be handed to you," Irving said about what he learned as a freshman. "And you have to work to earn the respect from the people around you. It was a really good learning experience and I think it benefited me more than if I had played."

After resting the two-game exhibition schedule to open the year, Irving returned to the training pitch on Monday and is eager to get on the field for the season opener. Kentucky will open its 2014 season on Friday at Wright State at 7 p.m. ET. The Wildcats will then open up the sparkling new Wendell & Vickie Bell Soccer Complex with Belmont on Sunday at 5 p.m. ET. 
In late July, nine student-athletes -- Bria Goss (women's basketball), Jared Phillips (track/cross country), Charlie Reymann (men's soccer), Montana Whittle (gymnastics), Danielle Fitzgerald (women's soccer), Katrina Keirns (swimming and diving), John Sutton (rifle), Kirsten Lewis (women's tennis), Haley Mills (women's golf) -- participated in the second of two annual service trips to Ethiopia sponsored by UK Athletics. Over the next week, they will take turns sharing their experiences through a series of blog entries. Please note that these posts are the student-athletes' personal reactions and the views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Kentucky or UK Athletics.

Today, Montana Whittle, Danielle Fitzgerald and Charlie Reymann each write about an unforgettable day spent in the poorest area of Addis Ababa.


Montana Whittle

Where to start?

I find myself at a loss of words, because this experience cannot be described. There are no words or pictures that do this place justice. I wish I could let you see my memories and feel what I have felt. I will do my best to help you understand this place and its people, but I would highly encourage you to explore this world yourself and challenge you to keep an open mind.  

Today started with an amazing plate of French toast and a cup of coffee, and finished with me questioning my entire existence.  After breakfast we were given a brief explanation of what the day would bring. At this time I thought I was going to change lives, but the truth is that my life would be changed, forever. We were told that we were going to visit the poorest part of Addis Ababa. It is about one square mile, maybe a little bigger, and is home to over 100,000 people. These people are the poorest of the poor, most of them have been shunned due to disabilities and illnesses, such as leprosy or HIV/AIDS.  

We pull up in our van to Mark's office and children swarm us. From the minute we walked outside to the time we left, those children held our hands. They were so excited to meet us and tell us about themselves. All they wanted was for us to remember them, pray for them, love them. These children had such a huge impact on me. They were the happiest kids I had ever met, and yet they had nothing. Most of them had shoes that were falling apart and clothes that were worn thin. The two boys who held my hand had asked me for things, such as clothes, shoes or food. It broke my heart that we were not allowed to give them anything, because it would be unfair to those who did not get something. All I wanted to do was give these kids everything they needed; I wanted to tell them that everything was going be OK. But, the truth is, I had no idea. The memory of these children chasing after our van when we left will stay with me forever.

Our mission today was to deliver food and supplies (coffee beans, macaroni, salt, matches and soap) to widows and families in need. At the office we met the women and children who were going to be receiving these supplies. These women were inspirational. Faithful. They were so grateful, even though some of them could not even walk. Two women in particular really impacted me because one was in a wheelchair and the other had a daughter who could not walk, so she carried her on her back. When we delivered their food to their homes, the walk was not short. These mothers did not complain. In fact they were overjoyed just to meet us and have us see their homes.

I have never seen such poor living conditions, where their walls were sod, their roofs were tin and their floors were mud. A large house would be the size of our bathrooms in America. Yet, we were invited in without a moment's hesitation. They were so proud and had no shame; they wanted us to see everything in their homes and even offered us coffee. The first thing they did was thank us and tell us that they would be praying for us every day. I could not help but get emotional; I was not the one who needed prayers. I have never seen God work through people so much. They had so much going against them -- missing limbs, leprosy, unable to walk, crooked feet -- and yet they still were so patient with us, still so loving, still so faithful, still so happy.  


My experience today and every day this week was unreal and unforgettable. Now that I am home, all I can think about are those beautiful people that I met and my plan to return in the future. This experience has caused me to question everything that I know and everything that I want. Everything that was so important to me in the past is not important anymore. I know this experience has changed me for the better and I hope I never forget the faces and hearts of the people of Ethiopia.

Danielle Fitzgerald

Today was spent in one of the world's poorest places, which is built around the city dump. We started the morning with our standard "UK breakfast special" consisting of French toast and eggs but nothing we saw after was familiar. We were aware of the immense state of poverty but familiarity stopped there.

As we rolled up to the office that works to provide sponsorships to the people of the area, we were instantly greeted by big grins and precious little hands that wanted to be held. The instant joy the kids felt from simply having somebody touch them was quite overwhelming.

Mark took us into the office where we formed an assembly line to package macaroni, salt, body soap and other items for people who had been put on the sponsorship wait list. The recipients were sitting outside of the office and even though most were suffering from starvation, HIV/AIDS or leprosy, the pure joy they expressed seemed to be most contagious. We each carried a bag full of necessities to different houses, kids still in tow throughout the day. Although their houses' sizes were more comparable to a standard American bathroom than an American house, everyone was so proud to show us their homes and invite us to stay.

Each member of our team had about three kids latched onto them throughout the day and close to 100 followed us both when we were walking from house to house and running closely behind when our van took us to other parts of the town. There are few words to describe the emotions felt when a swarm of kids chases your van for miles and the two or three kids you've grown very close to come find you again, happy as can be to have done so. The simplest things brought them the most joy: thumb wars, hand games and skipping through the streets. Not even a language barrier could hinder that. Many of the kids would push their way through the line of hands to get closer to us but they did not realize they were the real celebrities, their endless love and eagerness to get to know us more admirable than our presence.


One of the hardest parts of the day was leaving the kids we had established relationships with. Eyes teared up when our new friends asked for pens to write their names on our arms in hopes that we would remember them forever and keep them in our prayers. Nothing can prepare you for the moment that two little girls ask you to take them home with you because life would be better that way.

It is so easy for us to get caught up in how busy our own lives are and forget about what is really important. These people don't have money to spend, cars to drive or cell phones to obsess over. They do have each other. And without worldly relationships, they still have a strong faith in God. I have never been so overwhelmed by such a concentrated sentiment of love. Relationships were valued so much more when there was not an emphasis on material possessions. Every person we came in contact with was significantly happier with their lives than I have ever seen before and I believe there is something to be said for that. Material poverty and spiritual wealth may not look glamorous from the outside looking in, but a completely different story was told once we were able to see from these beautiful people's perspective, even if only for a small fraction of time.

Charlie Reymann


Today was our second day in Ethiopia and it was full of eye-opening experiences. We started off with breakfast and then traveled to an area considered one of the poorest places in Ethiopia. The city began when all the people with leprosy were sent away and as time went on more and more outcasts were sent here. It surrounds a trash dump, and sometimes the people will search in the dump for food or supplies for their houses. We knew going into this day that this will be something we will never forget.

It is such a blessing to be able to experience a place like this. As we arrived, the first observations we had were the amount of people on the streets and what they called their homes. In the U.S. a home like we saw would make people look the other way. The houses were made from mud, wood and tin roof. And they were just thankful to have a home, something I think we all take for granted.

Once we arrived, we teamed up with a community center to provide some of the people in the community with a month's worth of supplies. The community center we worked with sponsors women and men from the city. The people that we helped today were men and women in line for the next sponsor. Some of the supplies we gave to them were macaroni, coffee beans, sugar and soap. We split up into little teams to make the process go as smoothly as possible. Since we are all athletes we all know how to work in a team, so we got to work.

Once we were done we all got the privilege to hand these men and women their supplies, which was a wonderful sight. Seeing their faces as we gave them the supplies was remarkable. They all said "God bless you" in English when we gave them their bag. After we gave them their supplies, some of us followed them to their houses to help carry them. These women came a long way to get their supplies, if I had to guess the farthest was two miles. And the lady who traveled the two miles was in a wheel chair!

As we walked with these women, questions came into my head. How does a place get like this? How does any human live in this city? Is there any solution to this problem? We may never know the answers to those questions but seeing the children filled us all with joy. Children came from everywhere to walk with us like we were rock stars. Each of us had at least three children holding our hands. Their smiles and joy were contagious to all of us. A place where it is hard to find anything to be happy about, these children could not stop smiling.

As I walked with these kids, I realized they were just happy to be alive. Video games and computers did not matter to them unlike kids in America. Materialistic goods are what most Americans really care about: their phones, their cars and their jewelry. These people have nothing and they all act like they have everything they need and more. It made us realize that we do not need all the "things" we own to be happy. They just enjoyed being with their friends and walking around with Americans for the day. And making new friends! We were their idols. They were thankful for a new friend, and that someone will be thinking about them. We get so caught up in our little world that we are not thankful for small things in life because we take them for granted.

We all went back to the community center to regroup and get ready for lunch. We went to a restaurant and almost everybody ordered a pizza. My pizza was delicious! We travel with three Ethiopian kids our age to help us learn the culture, translate, and most of all become our friends. Their names are Wario, Girma, and Khalib. They all made us try this green hot sauce that was like fire in your mouth. According to them everyone is used to hot spices in Ethiopia so when Americans come, they are not used to how hot the food is. Besides the green sauce that we tried everything was great and we headed back to explore the city a little more.

After lunch, we walked right up to the dump. We went inside a small village that was right next to it and the craziest thing happened. The little kids who were with us all morning found us and walked with us again!

I could not understand how some of these families can live this close to the dump and be so happy with their lives. No one would ever live as close to a trash dump as these homes were in the United States. We all went into the village and Mark called us around this small boy. He then told us that the kid he was holding up had a tumor above his eye not too long ago. One of the families who sponsored his family paid for this child to have his tumor removed. The kid could not have been more than four years old. This story touched all of our hearts. God used the sponsor to save that little boy's life. A remarkable story that we will never forget.

In Ethiopia everything is about relationships, and I experienced that right when I got off the bus. A little kid named Honuk, 10 years old, ran right up to me and asked me my name. I was very impressed with his English, and for the rest of the day we were best friends. He asked me questions about everything that had to do with America and told me as much as he could about his life. Listening to him talk about his life just made me want to help him in every way I could. I gave him one of the soccer balls we brought and he was so excited to get a new ball. As he was carrying the ball around all his friends you could tell he felt really special that he had the new Nike soccer ball. Throughout the day I kept finding myself thinking how smart this kid is and if there was anything I could do to help his life. He was so joyful and happy to be where he was.

All the kids were so happy! They were happy because they know that they mean something to someone who lives outside their village. That means so much to them. Honuk and some of the other kids wanted us to remember their names so bad that they wrote them on our arms. He borrowed a pen from a street vendor and pressed as hard as he could to spell out his name. The moment that will never leave my mind is when we were all getting on the bus to leave my new friend Honuk ran up to the bus and waved for me to open the window. With a smiling face and love in his eyes he said, "Charlie, I will miss you. I will pray for you." Those were the types of moments we all experienced today and I think we all agreed that we will never forget this day.

Walking through the city we saw more little kids laughing, playing, and loving each other than anywhere in the U.S. We saw mothers more proud of their homes than most mothers in America. They might not have as much money or opportunity but they have more joy and spirit. This day was an incredible day that we will always cherish in our hearts.  

Men's Soccer Pregame ODU Pump-Up Video

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Check out the pump-up video the Kentucky men's soccer coaching staff put together for before the UK vs. Old Dominion C-USA Quarterfinals game. The team watched it on the bus ride over to the stadium, then sprung a 1-0 overtime win on the Monarchs.

Nov. 3 Performances of the Week

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Every Tuesday, UK Athletics recognizes outstanding performances for our student-athletes. These are the honorees for the week ending Sunday, Nov. 3:

Men's soccer: Callum Irving

Sophomore goalkeeper Callum Irving continued his stellar season with a pair of shutout performances in UK's two-game week ... A native of Vancouver, British Columbia, Irving saved five shots in UK's 2-0 win at Marshall on Wednesday, including four key saves in a second half to keep the team in the game before UK scored two goals in the late half ... In UK's 6-1 win over Florida Atlantic, Irving worked the first 65 minutes scoreless, before subbing out in favor of senior Jack Van Arsdale on senior day ... Irving is sporting a stretch of 166 consecutive scoreless minutes played ... On the year, Irving has a 1.06 goals-against average in 12 games, with 33 saves and five shutouts.

Volleyball: Alexandra Morgan

Senior Alexandra Morgan had an exceptional week during UK's tough road stretch. Morgan notched a season-high 14 kills on a blistering .591 hitting percentage in helping UK snap a two-match losing streak to Arkansas. Morgan also posted a pair of digs and added six blocks. Kentucky turned away 15 Razorback attacks for the second-straight match with Morgan helping lead the way. At No. 7 and undefeated Missouri, Morgan posted eight kills on a team-high .316 hitting percentage for players with at least 10 attempts. For the week, she averaged 3.14 kills per set on a squad-best .463 hitting clip while adding a block per set.

Men's soccer: Tyler Riggs

Senior forward Tyler Riggs had the best week of his decorated career, totaling four goals in a two-game span, including the ninth hat trick in Kentucky history in a win over FAU ... In UK's must-win road tilt at Marshall on Wednesday, Riggs netted the game-winning goal in the second half and forced a penalty kick with a foul in the box for UK's second goal of the game ... A native of Louisville, Ky., Riggs netted three second-half goals to lead UK to a 6-1 win over FAU on Sunday, marking his first career hat trick ... All three of his goals came in his 24 minutes played in the second half ... Riggs now has four two or more goal game of his career ... He now has 28 goals in his career, the fourth-most in UK history ... His first goal of the trio vs. the Owls came just 23 seconds into the second half, the third-fastest goal to start the second half in program history ... Has five goals in 15 games in 2013, with 33 shots.

Volleyball: Sara Schwarzwalder

Sophomore Sara Schwarzwalder led the defensive charge for the Wildcats in a 1-1 week. She registered a career-high nine blocks in leading UK to a win over Arkansas on Friday. The nine blocks is the most by a UK player this season and just one shy of a Kentucky record for a four-set match. Schwarzwalder again led the Cats defensively in a heartbreaking loss at No. 7 and undefeated Missouri with a team-high four block assists.

Volleyball: Anni Thomasson

Freshman Anni Thomasson had a breakout offensive performance for the Cats in a 1-1 week. For the first time in her career she had back-to-back double-digit kill efforts. She began the week with 12 kills on .323 hitting in a victory over Arkansas. She followed that with a career-high 15 kill effort in a loss at Missouri. The freshman outside hitter had the most kills of any player on the court against the Tigers. Thomasson for the week averaged a team-high 3.86 kills per set and ranked second on the team with 4.00 points per frame. She also continued to be a steady defensively with an average of 2.00 scoops per set.

Kentucky men's soccer: Weekly update (Nov. 4)

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Overall Record: 6-8-2, 3-3-2 C-USA
Record Last Week: 2-0-0, 2-0-0 C-USA

Recent Results
Wednesday, Oct. 30 - won at Marshall, 2-0 | RECAP
Sunday, Nov. 3 - won vs. Florida Atlantic, 6-1 | RECAP


Upcoming Schedule (times Eastern)
Tuesday, Nov. 5 - vs. Wright State - 7 p.m. [HOME FINALE]
Saturday, Nov. 9 - at New Mexico - 7 p.m.

Offensive Player of the Week Nominee
Sr., F, Tyler Riggs (Louisville, Ky.)

NOTES: Senior forward Tyler Riggs had the best week of his decorated career, totaling four goals in a two-game span, including the ninth hat trick in Kentucky history in a win over FAU ... In UK's must-win road tilt at Marshall on Wednesday, Riggs netted the game-winning goal in the second half and forced a penalty kick with a foul in the box for UK's second goal of the game ... A native of Louisville, Ky., Riggs netted three second-half goals to lead UK to a 6-1 win over FAU on Sunday, marking his first career hat trick ... All three of his goals came in his 24 minutes played in the second half ... Riggs now has four two or more goal game of his career ... He now has 28 goals in his career, the fourth-most in UK history ... His first goal of the trio vs. the Owls came just 23 seconds into the second half, the third-fastest goal to start the second half in program history ... Has five goals in 15 games in 2013, with 33 shots.

Defensive Player of the Week Nominee
So., Callum Irving, GK (Vancouver, British Columbia)

NOTES: Sophomore goalkeeper Callum Irving continued his stellar season with a pair of shutout performances in UK's two-game week ... A native of Vancouver, British Columbia, Irving saved five shots in UK's 2-0 win at Marshall on Wednesday, including four key saves in a second half to keep the team in the game before UK scored two goals in the late half ... In UK's 6-1 win over Florida Atlantic, Irving worked the first 65 minutes scoreless, before subbing out in favor of senior Jack Van Arsdale on senior day ... Irving is sporting a stretch of 166 consecutive scoreless minutes played ... On the year, Irving has a 1.06 goals-against average in 12 games, with 33 saves and five shutouts.

Team Notes
The Kentucky men's soccer team completed a crucial two-game week with a pair of wins to clinch a berth in the 2013 Conference USA Tournament. UK posted a 2-0 win at Marshall on Wednesday and a 6-1 win over Florida Atlantic on Sunday for Senior Day.


Kentucky (6-8-2, 3-3-2 C-USA) will return to action with its 2013 home finale against Wright State at 7 p.m. ET at the UK Soccer Complex. The Wildcats will then wrap up the regular season with a tilt at red-hot, league-leading New Mexico on Saturday, with kickoff slated for 7 p.m. ET. Courtesy of its win over FAU and a Tulsa win over FIU, UK clinched a berth in the league tournament in Charlotte, N.C., Nov. 10-15.

The Wildcats rode a historic scoring week for senior forward Tyler Riggs and a stingy defense to a pair of wins to clinch a postseason berth. Riggs netted a game-winning goal in UK's win at Marshall, also setting up a foul in the box for a penalty kick goal in the 2-0 win. On Sunday, for senior day, Riggs exploded for the ninth hat trick in UK soccer history, getting all three goals in his 24 minutes played in the second half in UK's 6-1 smashing win.

Kentucky's win over FAU was its largest result in its time in C-USA (2005-2013) and marked its largest win in league action since 1999. UK got the three goals from Riggs, with senior Steven Perinovic also getting his first goal of the year and freshmen Kaelon Fox and Ryan Creel getting on the board. Senior Brad Doliner scored UK's penalty kick goal at Marshall on Wednesday to help highlight a strong week for UK's senior class.

The Wildcats have netted 22 goals in 16 games in 2013, allowing 20 tallies and owning a 1.21 goals-against average with five shutouts. UK also has advantages in shots (256-155) and corners (97-70).

Individually, UK has been led in scoring by Doliner, who has five goals and one assist. Riggs has five goals, with Isak Krogstad owning four goals and two assists. Freshmen Napo Matsoso and Sam Miller each have a goal and four assists, with junior Justin Laird leading the team with six saves. Fox has two goals and one assist, with Jacob Scearce sporting a goal and two assists. Freshmen Creel and Charlie Reymann each have a goal and an assist, with Perinovic owning one goal. Bryan Celis has added three assists, with Matt Quick also adding an assist.

In goal, Callum Irving has a 1.06 goals-against average in 12 games, saving 33 shots and sporting five shutouts. Senior Jack Van Arsdale has played in five games with a 1.63 goals-against average, saving seven shots, including two on senior day Sunday vs. FAU.

Freshman Napo Matsoso has started all 13 games during his first season and is second on the team in minutes played. (Chet White/UK Athletics) Freshman Napo Matsoso has started all 13 games during his first season and leads the team in minutes played. (Chet White/UK Athletics)

The Kentucky men's soccer team was going through its typical walkthrough in Norfolk, Va., before a game with Old Dominion when dynamic freshman midfielder Napo Matsoso went down with a turned ankle.

While limping through the rest of the night and into the next day, it seemed unlikely that UK would have its star freshman on the field.

NAPO'S COLLEGE SOCCER FAMILY

Napo Matsoso
MF, Fr., Kentucky
Lesotho/Louisville, Ky. (St. Francis)

2013: 13 games, 1 goal, 1 assist

Setho Moshoeshoe
MF, Fr., Northern Kentucky
Lesotho/Luisville, Ky. (St. Francis)

2013: 10 games, 2 goals

Sunny Jane
F, Sr., Maryland
Lesotho/Louisville, Ky. (Trinity)

2013: 14 games, 5 assists
2012: 24 games 2 goals, 4 assists
* Second-Team All-ACC
* NCAA Runner Up
2011: 20 games, 1 goal, 8 assists
2010: 19 games, 3 goals, 1 assist

Lepe Seetane
MF, Sr., Northwestern
Lesotho/Louisville Ky. (Trinity)

2013: 14 games, 1 goal, 4 assists
2012: 21 games, 1 goal
2011: 21 games, 5 goals, 3 assists
* Second-Team All-B1G
2010: 18 games, 2 goals, 1 assist
* B1G All-Freshman Team

Come kickoff that night and after giving it a test run during warm ups, Matsoso was in the starting 11 for UK's crucial conference clash with ODU. He played every second of UK's overtime victory over the league-leading Monarchs, with the Wildcats winning it in the 98th minute on Brad Doliner's golden goal.

Matsoso, a native of Louisville, Ky., who originally hails from Lesotho, a small landlocked country in the middle of South Africa, attended St. Francis High School in Louisville, where he earned first-team all-state honors, amassing a total of 72 goals in four years.

He has been a sparkplug for the Wildcats as a freshman, starting all 13 games in the midfield and leading the team in minutes played. He is one of only three players to start each game, joining fifth-year seniors Doliner and Steven Perinovic. 

"Everything is going well, even though we haven't had the best results, we're having fun and we just have to keep it up," Matsoso said. "Coming from a different country, this is my second home. Everyone on the team is there for me whenever I get homesick. They are always there to pick me up and tell me to keep my head up."

After coming to the United States from Lesotho, Matsoso was adopted by Marc and Pam Maguire and he quickly joined a family legacy of soccer stars. He has five brothers, James Maguire (22), Setho Moshoeshoe (18), Lepe Seetane (21), Sunny Jane (21) and Marc.

Like one would imagine, there was an adjustment period when he first arrived in the United States.

"At first I was scared because I didn't know how to speak English but I adjusted a little quicker because I have four brothers that were also adopted in my family," Matsoso said. "They were always there to help teach me English and get me used to the environment."

James played at Mt. St. Joseph's College in Ohio, Setho is in his first year with Northern Kentucky, Lepe stars for Northwestern, Sunny is one of the nation's top talents at Maryland and Marc is currently working on his undergraduate degree at UK.

With three brothers also playing Division I soccer, it might be a tough task to find out who is the best among them.

"Obviously, me," Matsoso said without hesitation. "I'm the best; there are no worries about that."

But with less than a full season of collegiate soccer under his belt, Matsoso realizes there are still areas of his game that he needs to improve.

"I need to work on my strength and be more involved with the ball. So far I have only one goal and that's not the way I want it to be," Matsoso said. "That is something I'm working on, as well as shooting. I haven't had a lot of shots on goal and that's something I need to improve."

Kentucky head coach Johan Cedergren echoed his young star's assessment of what he still needs to improve in order for him to become a complete player.

"We need to work a little bit on his finishing," Cedergren said. "He gets in good spots and sometimes we could ask a little more there, but his strengths outweigh his weaknesses. He just reads the game so well and his touch and his control for the ball is fantastic."

When Cedergren took the job at UK in December of 2011, he immediately started hearing things about this 5-foot-6 inch, 138-pound kid from nearby Louisville.

"I thought there was talent there but I thought his size might hinder him a little bit in college," Cedergren said.  "As I kept watching him, he kept growing on me. He's always been small and I think he can handle it because he's pretty physical himself. He was someone that initially I didn't know if he was going to be able to handle Division-I soccer but the more I looked at him the more convinced I became that he would be a good fit for us."

For freshman to step in and contribute right away on the field is not common in Division I soccer. Cedergren said that it's hard to expect freshmen to have an impact immediately because there is a sizable adjustment period.

Even Matsoso said he didn't foresee himself starting instantly because of the physical nature of the college game compared to high school. But there's something special about Matsoso that is hard to ignore.

"We were looking for someone in the midfield that can have that creative role," Cedergren said about Matsoso's impact. "He battles. He is good on the ball. We knew he was definitely one of the two or three guys that would be able to start immediately for us. I knew he would have a good chance to play a lot but I didn't know he would be able to step up this quickly. Clearly, he's done a great job."

When you watch Matsoso play, it's easy to see why his head coach has such high regard for him. He is one of those players that just seem to constantly be around the ball. The ball finds him. He runs with ease and he looks like he could go for days.

He has played every minute in 11 of the 13 games this season, including two double-overtime games that ended in ties. Players like Matsoso don't come around all the time.

"It's called reading the game," Cedergren explained. "Can you be a little quicker? Can you think on your feet? He's really, really smart. He's a very intelligent player and he's really good when he starts playing with (Bryan) Celis and some of the other guys we have.

"His ability to turn a bigger defender and use the mass that he has to his advantage is great. There isn't a tight space that he can't get out of. He's someone that we aren't afraid to play the ball to in a tight space because we know he's going to get out of it. That's really important, someone that retains possession and creates attack for us."

If this season is any indication of what the next three years hold for Matsoso at Kentucky, then it looks bright.

"Gritty," Cedergren said when asked to describe Matsoso. "Because he does get kicked a lot and by now when we're 13 games into the season, every team we play from this point forward, they are more or less man-marking him, so he's got to battle with a much bigger guy for 90 minutes. Every time he's trying to get on the ball, he has a guy trying to get him off the ball and he just does not stop. He keeps going. Grit and determination are two words that are definitely on the top of my list for Napo."

Sounds like a pretty good description for a player who has only just begun to scratch the surface of his full potential.

Recent Comments

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