Cat Scratches
Interactive Twitter Facebook

Recently in general athletics news Category

Video: Wildcats reflect on Ethiopia service trip

| No TrackBacks | Add a Comment

SEC Network programming taking shape

| No TrackBacks | Add a Comment
In just nine months, the Southeastern Conference and ESPN will launch the SEC Network together.

It's now becoming clearer exactly what fans can expect to see on the network.

SEC Commissioner Mike Slive and ESPN's Senior Vice President Justin Connolly held a joint press conference on Friday at the Georgia Dome before the league's football championship game, making several announcements about the network.

Headlining the press conference was the announcement that the SEC will kick off the 2014 football season on the network with a Thursday-night doubleheader. It will mark the first time ever that the college football year will begin on a conference network.

"In a span of two days or three days, we'll have five football games on the SEC Network, and then a triple-header every Saturday thereafter," Slive said. "Our goal is to get somewhere close to 45 football games on the network each fall."

Joining the previously announced Texas A&M-South Carolina game, Temple and Vanderbilt will face off on Aug. 28 to get the 2014 season rolling. UK won't play in the opening doubleheader, but you can be sure the Wildcats will play on the SEC Network multiple times in Mark Stoops' second season.

For that reason, it remains important that UK fans make their voices heard in calling for their cable and satellite providers to carry the SEC Network. AT&T U-verse remains the only national distributor signed on the carry the SEC Network, with providers like Time Warner, DirecTV and Dish Network still not on board.

Fans can visit GetSECNetwork.com to check whether their cable and satellite providers carry the SEC Network and, if they do not, contact them to demand they do. Cable and satellite providers make programming decisions based on customer requests. Fans should also regularly check GetSECNetwork.com for the latest information about the launch of the new SEC Network.  

For fans in Lexington that want the new SEC Network, Time Warner subscribers should call 859-514-1400, DirecTV subscribers should call 1-800-347-3288 and DISH Network subscribers should call 1-800-333-3474 to let them know you want the SEC Network. Cable TV subscribers outside Lexington can obtain the phone number to call from GetSECNetwork.com.

Beyond the live events that will air on the SEC Network, Slive and Connolly announced two exciting shows that will be shown regularly.

First is a two-hour traveling Saturday pregame show called SEC Nation that will be hosted by Joe Tessitore. A sort of SEC-centric version of ESPN's popular College GameDay, SEC Nation will travel to an SEC campus each week, starting with stops in Columbia, S.C., for South Carolina-Texas A&M on Aug. 28 and Auburn, Ala., for Auburn-Arkansas on Aug. 30.

"The thing that's unique about the SEC, as all of you know is what the pregame experience is, and we want to take people into that," said ESPN's Stephanie Druley. "We want people at home to feel like I've been there even though I haven't. Because there is nothing like it."

Additionally, the SEC Storied documentary series that began in 2011 will expand on the SEC Network. Ten original features will be produced next year to celebrate the rich tradition of the nation's best conference.

"We'll go from four to ten a year, and we'll debut six of the ten on the network, and we'll debut the other four on ESPNU, and then move it over to the network," Slive said. "So that rounds out, at least for me, the storytelling. You know, it celebrates great games, great athletes and great moments."

With approximately 45 SEC football games, more than 100 men's basketball games, 60 women's basketball games, 75 baseball games and events from 21 more SEC sports set to air, more such moments will surely be airing live on the SEC Network. Visit GetSECNetwork.com to make sure you can see them.


UK Athletics preparing for SEC Network transition

| No TrackBacks | 7 Comments
Last Friday, thousands of fans across the country tuned in to Fox Sports South to watch as the men's basketball team opened a highly anticipated 2013-14 campaign.

Later that same evening, thousands more around the Bluegrass watched delayed broadcasts of the games on the UK IMG Network.

In recent years, Kentucky fans have come to rely on those avenues to watch their beloved Wildcats, but beginning next season that will all change.

In August 2014, ESPN and the Southeastern Conference will combine forces to launch the new SEC Network. The network will air SEC content 24 hours a day, seven days a week, including 45 SEC football games, more than 100 men's basketball games, 60 women's basketball games, 75 baseball games and events from across the SEC's 21 sports annually.

"The SEC Network will be an incredible asset for our conference and for UK Athletics," UK Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart said. "It will provide unprecedented exposure for our teams, but we need the Big Blue Nation to help make it a success."

Many UK games currently televised on ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU, Fox Sports South, UK IMG Network, CSS and SEC TV will likely be available only the new SEC Network.  With future games like men's basketball's season opener vs. UNC Asheville and the recent football game against Alabama State likely moving to the new SEC Network beginning in 2014-15, fans need to demand their cable and satellite providers carry it. Considering marquee in-conference matchups in both basketball and football will also be televised on the new network, it becomes even more imperative.

The SEC Network launches in nine months, but so far AT&T U-verse is the only national distributor of the network. As of November, providers like Time Warner, DirecTV and Dish Network have not yet made arrangements to carry the SEC Network, meaning subscribers would miss many live UK events.

That's where the Big Blue Nation comes in.

Fans can visit GetSECNetwork.com to check whether their cable and satellite providers carry the SEC Network and, if they do not, contact them to demand they do. Cable and satellite providers make programming decisions based on customer requests. Fans should also regularly check GetSECNetwork.com for the latest information about the launch of the new SEC Network.  

For fans in Lexington that want the new SEC Network, Time Warner subscribers should call 859-514-1400, DirecTV subscribers should call 1-800-347-3288 and DISH Network subscribers should call 1-800-333-3474 to let them know you want the SEC Network. Cable TV subscribers outside Lexington can obtain the phone number to call from GetSECNetwork.com.

Meanwhile, UK Athletics is currently working to prepare for the SEC Network's launch. All live broadcasts -- including the more than 600 that will be streamed live online -- on the SEC Network will have the highest quality production value and maintain a look and feel consistent with ESPN's other networks.

Representatives from the SEC Network have visited all UK Athletics facilities in recent months in advance of the launch. They have found that UK has an advanced technological infrastructure that should make the transition as seamless as possible.

After the launch of the SEC Network next August, more UK events will be televised that ever before. To make sure you can watch, visit GetSECNetwork.com and let your cable and satellite provider know you want access to the SEC Network.

Video: Barnhart and The Wildcat 'brave the blue'

| No TrackBacks | Add a Comment


Once again, UK ranks among the top schools in the nation in merchandise royalties.

On Monday, the Collegiate Licensing Company released royalty rankings for the period from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013. UK comes in fifth, trailing only Texas, Alabama, Notre Dame and Michigan. A season ago, UK was a school-record third on the strength of the 2012 men's basketball national championship. UK is also one of six Southeastern Conference schools in the top 10 in the most recent rankings.

UK Athletics and the university share all merchandise royalties equally. UK Athletics is responsible for all costs associated with managing the licensing program and 90 percent of merchandise sold is athletic-related. Through the merchandise program, UK Athletics has contributed more than $10 million to the university during the Mitch Barnhart era.

Maclin Simpson helped deliver basic necessities to residents of Ethiopia on Sunday. (Britney McIntosh, UK Athletics) Maclin Simpson helped deliver basic necessities to residents of Ethiopia on Sunday. (Britney McIntosh, UK Athletics)
This week, eight Wildcats are taking part in a service trip in Ethiopia. Throughout the week, the student-athletes will take turns describing their experience. Please note that these posts are the personal reactions of the student-athletes and the views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Kentucky and UK Athletics. With the travel party set to return to the United States on Monday, Maclin Simpson writes about what he saw on Sunday.

Maclin Simpson (swimming and diving)

I woke up this morning feeling mixed emotions about the day ahead. On one hand, I was excited for another opportunity to serve the people of Ethiopia with a group of friends I would consider family. On the other, I was anxious because I knew that my expectations were about to be shattered into a million pieces, yet again turning my world upside down.

The day started just like any other. We had breakfast at the guest house followed by a quick meeting before we set out. After reconfirming our flight information, we had about an hour or so to kill so we made our way over to the zoo. I use the term "zoo" loosely because it isn't comparable to anything you would find in the U.S. More or less it was just one massive, circular cage with about ten lions that looked like they could eat any one of us without a moment's hesitation. Regardless, it was still a cool experience.

Then it all changed.

The moment that we got out of the van at the community center, we were swarmed with loving children. It was unbelievable to see the pure joy in their faces just to hold our hands and walk with us. Our task was to fill bags with assorted basic necessities and deliver them to widows and other families. Throughout our time there, the one thing that was constant was how gracious these amazing people were. It didn't matter who we were, just that we came. To them, we were an answered prayer and a gift from God. Every home that we visited (most were about half the size of a dorm room, dark and housing up to seven people) we prayed over the people about whatever physical or emotional discomfort was troubling them. Each time, without fail, they would tell us how much they loved us and prayed that God would bless us and our families. It's incredible that a village and people in such desperate need of financial capital were so content with human capital. The last home we visited was of a widow who suffers from tuberculosis; Jarrod Polson and I literally had to chase after her because she was so excited to invite us into her home and introduce us to her children. We sat, prayed and shared a hug that could have lasted a lifetime. It is those types of moments that make me realize how much of a gift from God life truly is and how much I take for granted on a daily basis. We all left that village changed and with memories that we will never forget.

Tomorrow is our last day here. I am going to miss this place and will forever be grateful for the opportunities given, experiences had, but most importantly for the people that I have met and the relationships I have formed.

Tiara Phipps bonded with Ethiopia natives playing soccer on Saturday. (Britney McIntosh, UK Athletics) Tiara Phipps bonded with Ethiopia natives playing soccer on Saturday. (Britney McIntosh, UK Athletics)
This week, eight Wildcats are taking part in a service trip in Ethiopia. Throughout the week, the student-athletes will take turns describing their experience. Please note that these posts are the personal reactions of the student-athletes and the views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Kentucky and UK Athletics. Tiara Phillips writes about Saturday's activities.

Tiara Phipps (gymnastics)

Day four was like nothing I've ever experienced, which seems to be a common theme for this entire trip.  

9 a.m.: We left the Addis Guest House to head for the soccer fields for what we thought would be our forte: sports. The weather was unfavorable, but not one thing stops the Ethiopians from experiencing life.

9:27 a.m.: One of our translators, an incredibly intelligent mind who has never set foot in a school, told us his story. It's incredible that a young man who learned English in an orphanage, who was thrown into the wild at age 7, and experienced so many things we couldn't even imagine, is as receptive, generous and protective as anyone could ever hope to be. This is one of the huge examples for me of what it takes to be Ethiopian. STRENGTH. The people of this country grow more beautiful to me each day, but it's not an expected beauty, it's unintentional, unorthodox and a beauty that's truly a blessing to witness. We reach the fields after a walk through livestock, and immediately see the kids. They are already passing the ball, and getting dirty and into the game that's king in their nation. Our family is such a mixture of athletes from different sports that we had no idea what to expect from each other when playing soccer, but nevertheless it was fun. We started passing with the children and it's incredible how universal sport is. We speak two completely different languages, yet I was never uncomfortable hitting the ball with my head to a complete foreigner and the same for them with me.

12:45 p.m.: "They're better (at soccer) with their shoes off than we are with cleats on." A hilarious statement by Stephanie Fox at first, but an analogy at second glance. They experience more permanent happiness than I have ever seen with less than I have ever seen. After being made to look foolish by the Ethiopians, we took a little hike to the top of the mountain to find an incredible view and a perfect spot for a mini photo shoot session. The boys took a couple bro pics, and the girls smiled big, then we made fools of ourselves and loved every second of it. Later, after some slight misunderstandings and stop and goes to find a restaurant, we decided on a cultural place with great food and even better entertainment.

7:58 p.m.: This dancing is so athletic, it hurt my shoulders just watching them have the time of their lives with absolutely no breaks. Finally, Jarrod Polson got his shot at being the hero as one of the dancers approached our table, a chant broke out and I'll just say that video is one to watch.

This culture and the lessons it has taught me will stay with me forever, just like I hope the people I've met on this trip will never fade in my memory. I just want to say that I'm blessed beyond belief to be on this trip with this amazing team of people I'm sad I have to leave soon. This little group has become like a little family, and I appreciate every single one of them.

Every single thought on an Ethiopian's mind no matter the situation this entire trip has been on God blessing us, but we are simply His hands and feet. In spite of everything they absolutely need, they need us to be blessed. It's unfathomable the amount of love I'm developing for this country, this team and this culture. With that being said, I thank everyone for their prayers and pray that God blesses every single one of you.

Eight UK student-athletes spent their third day in Ethiopia on Friday. (Britney McIntosh, UK Athletics) Eight UK student-athletes spent their third day in Ethiopia on Friday. (Britney McIntosh, UK Athletics)
This week, eight Wildcats are taking part in a service trip in Ethiopia. Throughout the week, the student-athletes will take turns describing their experience. Please note that these posts are the personal reactions of the student-athletes and the views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Kentucky and UK Athletics. Friday's blogs are from Emma Brown and Liz Breed.
   
Emma Brown (women's soccer)

"It's not about how big or small the gift, it's that you came."

Keeping my eyes open, providing my hands for a purpose and my heart to a people has given me an understanding of how time, words and relationships impact the world around you. How can you recognize the importance of a moment until it has slipped through your grasp, elusive as air? How can you feel the weight of words, both as heavy as they are light? How can one woman's thank you slow your heartbeat and warm your soul? "It's not about how big or small the gift," she said. "It's that you came." If you're pondering these same questions as I am from the confinements of a guest house in Ethiopia, I'll let you in on my newly discovered secret. Love, compassion, reflection, connection, that's how.

Our coach teaches us that every moment could be "the one" - the one that wins games or costs you your season. That is why you prepare and train and repeat, because you never know when that moment might come. The moment may be fleeting, like a shooting star streaking across the sky, brilliant and blinding and exceptional. Or maybe your moment was meant to be infinite, changing the blueprint of your life permanently. As our translator Kaleab relayed one woman's message to our group I realized the gravity of the moment I was in. The weight of words so lightly uttered in a dark and damp space that carried meaning that was just beyond the surface, if you were willing for your heart to find it.

In that epiphany-induced moment I came to learn much about humanity and myself. It's there as Africa's constant reminder to me - an action we think is so small can actually be something much bigger than us, our ideals, and the hopes we hold for each other. It's not necessarily about the amount of money we give or the food we hand out, it is that we cared enough to just give them a new shot of life, new wind under their wings. It's not that the difference you make is one that changes everything, but that you had the courage and compassion to take the first step towards something better.

Yesterday was about learning lessons for me, and today I was thankful for the lighter feeling that a day of sightseeing and shopping provided. It was a beautiful day to decompress and unburden some of the heaviness from the previous day. Nice weather throughout most of the day gave us the opportunity to "haggle" for gifts and glimpse some of Addis Ababa's landmarks. Even as the rain came we still had a great lunch and scarf extravaganza, where the boys were taught valuable lessons in how to pick out the right color scarves to complement their girlfriends and wives (really boys are about as clueless to the difference between pastels and prints as you would think, and that is not a new lesson for anyone). I'm excited for what tomorrow will bring and thankful for the time I've been allotted in this amazing country.

Liz Breed (women's golf)

You think you've prepared yourself for things outside of your comfort zone, but when you're out there, there are no words. There is nothing you can say to aptly summarize what you've seen.

Today we went shopping; we were tourists today. But shopping here is nothing like shopping at home. You barter and trade for the lowest price possible. (The American dollar is worth about 18 Ethiopian birr, which is the money system).  There are young boys with trays of gum, begging for money. Adult men are following you to sell you maps or belts. All you can do is give a firm "no," and keep moving. You stick to your guns and show no mercy. If you do, they swarm. It sounds scary, but it's not. It's excitement of a different kind.

After shopping, we went to a coffee shop. Picture: Starbucks, Ethiopian style. The colors and ambiance were the same, the drinks were the same, the baristas were wearing green aprons. It's the same thing...and just as good.

After coffee, back to shopping.

All in all, it was a fun day. Just...different.

Being in such a different culture has been overwhelmingly amazing and terrifying at once. You hear about it, but it's never what you've imagined. You could never prepare for a trip like this.

This week, eight Wildcats are taking part in a service trip in Ethiopia. Throughout the week, the student-athletes will take turns describing their experience. Please note that these posts are the personal reactions of the student-athletes and the views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Kentucky and UK Athletics. For perspective on Thursday's activities, we turn to Angelica Whaley and Brett Johnson.

Angelica Whaley (track and field)

Angelica Whaley of UK track and field works interacts with locals in Ethiopia. (Britney McIntosh, UK Athletics) Angelica Whaley of UK track and field works interacts with locals in Ethiopia. (Britney McIntosh, UK Athletics)
We began our second day here in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, bright and early at 8 a.m. local time with breakfast and then headed to a local community center. There, we met a case worker that is the head of a sponsorship program for impoverished families. We found that our main task for the day was to deliver mattresses to families that were in need - a task that seemed so simple to us but meant so much to people who piled leaves on the ground as a form of bare minimum cushion from the ground. The first woman to whom we delivered a mattress and frame to was a recently saved, HIV-positive mother of one young boy. The joy and appreciation in her face was like an unexpected gift to me; she was so gracious. Her son who was about 2 or 3 years old was literally a bundle of joy who smiled and pranced around everywhere. To have what we, as Americans, would call "nothing" and to live as if he had everything in the world in the way he laughed, smiled, giggled, and played was truly a blessing to see. We gave him a small toy, nothing extravagant, and the way his face lit up is something that I will never forget. The way all the children's faces lit up even more when we gave them toys period was a sight to see; it was pure, unadulterated happiness.

We traveled to a nearby city named Kai Afar to deliver another mattress to a local widow. The outside of her house was plastered with mud but had a definite structure to it unlike many of the "huts" and "shacks" that we've seen thus far; her neighborhood is considered to be a part of the more urban area. She was so warm and welcoming. Once we gave her the mattress, she insisted that we come in her home and have a seat. A few of us eagerly piled in as she rummaged about, rearranging the small amount of furniture that she had so that we all could fit. She was beyond gracious and didn't know much English but one phrase that she was completely familiar with was "thank you." She constantly said "I'm very, very thank you." She prayed for us and told us that we were a blessing to her and that she loved us. She said it meant so much that we came such a long way to deliver her a mattress. She shared with us that she suffers from an internal disease that affects her nervous system, and it often times causes her to be sick. Also, she shared with us that she has three children, one of whom we met book-in-hand in her home. Three people were sleeping on the twin-sized makeshift bed she had when we got there, but tonight, she and her family will sleep more comfortably with an extra mattress on the ground. We offered to pray for her, and she agreed, but she asked that if we pray for her, pray for her extended family members as well.

After our prayers, she thanked us again and again and began to cry. She revealed to us that at times, she felt as if God didn't know her and that he forgot about her. She shared that all the times that she was sick, no one came to see her or help her with her family, but we came. She said that we were her treasure. What we did for her was greater than the mattress, and it was greater than the simple toy that we gave her neighbor. We became a tangible confirmation of her faith. She was at her breaking point with her situation, and God used us as a blessing for her life. The entire visit was emotionally heavy and left many of us in tears; it was incredible to feel God move in that way. Through everything, she has had steadfast faith, and through us, God was able to show her that He takes care of all of His people. It is important to know that here in Ethiopia, religion is everything, compared to America where religion is somewhat "lost."

Nothing but love was felt but little did she know she was truly as much of a blessing, if not more, to us as she said we were to her. She is a beautiful soul inside and out. Through it all, she continues to put others first. She is truly a woman of gold, and I will never forget those soft, endearing eyes. A mattress brought us together. It is the donation of a plain, old mattress that has deeply impacted my life. Even with all the miles apart, it is our love of Christ that will keep us together (as said by our new friend). And she is completely right. 

We spent the rest of the day building relationships, giving small toys to children, and giving away coffee and sugar to many poor women at the community center. They tell us that it's not how much we brought but that we came.  We came 9,000 miles to spend time with them, and they were so thankful. You often hear them say "ameseginalehu," which means "thank you" in their Amharic language. The same young boy whose mother received a mattress, later greeted us with hugs, plants, and flowers - gifts that have proven to be the sweetest I have ever received and will cherish forever. Everyone constantly says, "God bless you," and we said the same in return, but God is blessing us all along this journey.

Lastly, we drove an older woman that has sickness in her legs that even makes walking to her home difficult.  She is on the waiting list for a sponsor who can change her life emotionally, spiritually, and economically. Sponsorship only costs $35 U.S. We prayed for her, and she was gracious like all the other women with whom we came in contact. As of now and as a group, we are waiting to see if it is acceptable for us to sponsor her. 

Today was a day like no other day I will experience in my life.  We've asked ourselves questions like "How can they do this?" or "How can they live that way?" But, I've realized why would they question their lifestyles if they have never seen, heard or even thought differently? This world is all they know, and even still, they, as a people, are happier and more peaceful than any place in America.  They are patient and loving people who live in a place where men can walk hand in hand as a sign of love and respect for one another with no judgment. These people are too busy with survival to spend all of their days judging one another. I love this culture. I love these people. Compared to our country, they may be "poor" outwardly, but they are wealthy in their hearts and spirit. 

Brett Johnson (men's tennis)
Brett Johnson is spending this week in Ethiopia with seven fellow Wildcats. (Britney McIntosh, UK Athletics) Brett Johnson is spending this week in Ethiopia with seven fellow Wildcats. (Britney McIntosh, UK Athletics)
"Selam" (Hello), "Ameseginalehu" (Thank you), "Simi man new?" (What's your name?) and "Cint amete new?" (How old are you?), were just a few phrases that came in handy today. After some wonderful morning quiet time, outstanding breakfast and a quick run, we began our "never going to forget this day" journey.

We started off the day a little differently than expected. We made our way over to the community center to soon realize the supplies for the day were not yet ready. Pastor Mark thought it would be a good idea to go on over to the bank to "quickly" convert our U.S dollars to Ethiopian birr. We had everyone put all their money in a bag, and Stephanie Fox was elected to be our money representative. So Pastor Mark, Stephanie and I make our way into the bank, expecting a five-minute exchange. Oh no! After 45 minutes Stephanie was still in the back "exchanging" money. Not what we were expecting, but everything ended turning out fine. 

Upon receiving a phone call from the representative for the community center saying the supplies were ready, we headed back to the center. We loaded up several beds, several pillows and many sheets. We were ready to go serve. Our first stop was to a single mother, who was currently working a quick shop. We pulled up to her "shop" and I look over and I see a gleaming smile on this woman's face. She hurried over to the van to meet us all. After several minutes of talking, eating her biscuits and prayer with her, we were off to a small town called Kai Afar not realizing what some of us considered "a day we will never forget."

Pulling into these tin-roofed, plastic-covered homes, we arrive in Kai Afar. Several of us get out to deliver the mattress, pillows and sheets. We duck our heads, and enter this mud-covered home and are ushered by this joy-filled widow to "sit down and get comfortable." After small talk with this widow and her youngest daughter, our hearts begin to melt. We asked the lady if there was any prayers we could say for her and she proceeded to tell us about a dysfunction in her nervous system. She was in severe pain, but we would have NEVER guessed it! She seemed as if she had the whole world in her hands! The joy and positive attitude that this woman had and the faith she had that God would provide was astounding and it brought all of us to tears. When praying for her and praying for healing, we were all a wreck. After hugging and saying our good-byes, my eyes were opened to a reality. How much do I need to be thankful? This woman had NOTHING, yet seemed as if she had EVERYTHING. I was excited to see where God would put us next.
 
It was around lunchtime and we all were ready to eat. We ate at a rodeo restaurant, where many of us had authentic food. With our bellies full, we were ready to keep serving. We made our way back over to the community center where we distributed sugar and coffee to the mothers. Again, they couldn't stop thanking us and blessing us. Upon hearing stories from several of the women, a very special one stood up and shared her story. She was also a single mother, in need of money and a sponsor, because she is unable to work because of severe pains in both her legs and an HIV-positive diagnosis. Several of our hearts went out to her. Some of us drove her back to her home and were able to pray for healing and that an opportunity would open up for someone to sponsor her. Yet again, never would have guessed anything was wrong in her life because she was bubbly and always smiling and hugging. Again, how much do I need to be thankful?

It was beginning to get late so we all decided to head back to the guest house, where some of us realized we still had a lot of energy. So we asked Rock Oliver to take us to the gym to get a late night workout in. To say the least, I'm going to be super-sore in the morning. This concluded our wonderful Thursday. We all want to say thank you for the prayers and thoughts, we are continually driven by the joy these people express. Our hearts are captivated by their sincerity and thankfulness. We are excited to see God at work the rest of the trip!

Eight UK student-athletes arrived in Ethiopia on Wednesday. (Britney McIntosh, UK Athletics) Eight UK student-athletes arrived in Ethiopia on Wednesday. (Britney McIntosh, UK Athletics)
This week, eight Wildcats are taking part in a service trip in Ethiopia. Throughout the week, the student-athletes will take turns describing their experience. First up are Jarrod Polson and Stephanie Fox on their long voyage to Africa and their first day serving.

Jarrod Polson (men's basketball)

We started our journey to Ethiopia around 10 a.m. ET on Monday morning. We drove to the Cincinnati airport where we took off for Washington, D.C., arriving around 430 p.m. After checking into the hotel near the airport, we had the wonderful privilege of taking a three-hour tour around D.C in the "fun van," as our driver called it. We were able to see most of the famous attractions including the Lincoln Memorial, Washington Monument, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, Vietnam Veterans Memorial and even got a glimpse of the White House. During the tour, we were fed both a countless amount of information and some cheese puffs that were out of this world. Once done with that escapade, we proceeded to partake in the "last supper," as we liked to call it. We chose to go to the Cheesecake Factory and were not disappointed. Knowing that we probably wouldn't have an American meal for at least a week, we took the honor of each ordering an appetizer, an entree and a dessert. After stuffing our faces, we came back to the hotel and rested up for the journey ahead.

The next day we woke up around 6:30 a.m. so we could catch our 9:15 a.m. flight. After purchasing a comfortable neck pillow and a hearty bagel breakfast, we boarded the plane and began our 13-hour flight to Ethiopia.  Fortunately, it wasn't nearly as bad as I was expecting. The seats were pretty spread apart and after watching three movies, taking a few naps and reading a little bit, we finally landed in Africa promptly and safely. It took a while to get out of the airport because we had to go through customs. Once the particulars were done, we checked into the Addis Guest House. It didn't take long to see such a culture change from America to Ethiopia. One of the big things that I wasn't even expecting was the driving. Ethiopia is actually a very busy place to drive, and it doesn't help that there are hardly any lines on the road and people literally are walking in and out of traffic, even on the "highways." We quickly learned that it is kind of a free for all, as drivers do not stop for pedestrians, even if they are literally a few feet away from them. I also should mention that I heard more car honks today alone than I have in my entire life.

Anyways, after getting settled into our rooms we ate a quick breakfast right there at the guest house and got ready for the day. We drove to one of the poorer areas in Ethiopia and helped out with covering a woman's house with plastic as it wasn't keeping the rain and wind out very effectively.  A few of us went into the house and that's when it really hit me how underprivileged some of the people are. This house was about the size of a bedroom and was occupied by a few sheets and blankets for a bed, some old pots and pans and that's about it. It was hard not to feel bad for the woman, but the crazy part was just how joyful she seemed to be and thankful for what we were doing. Talk about a wakeup call!

My favorite part of the day by far was getting to meet my new buddy Alamiyoo. Funny story: As I was hammering some nails into the wood to keep the plastic up, a little 10-year-old boy came up to me and pretty much showed me how it was done. I'll be honest, I was a little mad at first because he was showing me up and making me look pretty worthless, but we soon became really good friends. I got to play a lot of "games" with him (mainly raising my hand up and seeing how high he could reach it or teaching him how to do the "Dougie") . Alamiyoo and all the other children we got to play with really taught us a good lesson. Here they are living in houses with dirt floors and plastic walls, hungry and thirsty most of the day, and they were some of the most joyous people I have ever met. I can think of so many times where I complain about the littlest things, and these kids have nothing and still have huge smiles on their faces. Today as a whole was very shocking, and I'm certain that the people of Ethiopia are going to help us out way more than we could ever even think of helping them, simply through the joy they show in the worst of circumstances.

Stephanie Fox (women's tennis)

We started out adventure in Ethiopia when we arrived at the airport at 7:30 a.m. Many of us got very little sleep but were still ready and excited for the day ahead. We arrived at our hotel - The Guest House - and after breakfast headed to work.

Our job was to insert plastic wrapping around two houses that helps keep wind and rain out. This is very important because it is winter in Ethiopia and rains nearly every day! The people were very grateful and it was a great time working with them to help improve their living situation as best we could.

The families were great and I think a lot of us would agree a huge highlight of the day was the children we spent time with at the houses. They were all vibrant and full of energy! I can already tell this trip is going to help each of us grow and I'm so thankful to experience this with other UK athletes. Can't wait to experience the rest of the trip!

Recent Comments

  • Guy Ramsey: The song is "The Mighty Rio Grande" by the band This Will Destroy You. read more
  • Griffin: What's the name of the song that this video starts playing when describing Cal getting ejected and Aaron talking about read more
  • Quinn : It was an amazing run! I hope you all return and make another stab at it. read more
  • Sandy Spears: I completely with the person's comment above. So proud of all the young men and their accomplishments. They have everything read more
  • BJ Rassam: The Cats came so close to winning another NCAA basketball championship. read more
  • chattyone: Congratulations to our Wildcats! They are terrific. All of us just like these young men are disappointed in the loss, read more
  • clint bailes: Such a great season! You guys fought hard til the end. Loved watchin the season! Can't wait til next season. read more
  • Andrea Boyd: you guys are AMAZING! as individuals and as a team. thank you for your tremendous playing and work and attitudes. read more
  • laura n: What an honor and privledge to watch all of you grow into incredible young men. Never enjoyed a season more. read more
  • Amy Carnes: Very proud of you cats you have really grow as a team .You proved all the doubters wrong. And have read more