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UK is ranked No. 13 in the latest Directors' Cup standings, well ahead of the pace set by last year's record No. 25 finish. (Chet White, UK Athletics) UK is ranked No. 13 in the latest Directors' Cup standings, well ahead of the pace set by last year's record No. 25 finish. (Chet White, UK Athletics)
A season ago, UK Athletics set a record by finishing in the top 25 of Directors' Cup standings for the first time in school history.

Now, UK is poised to blow that record-setting performance out of the water.

Kentucky ranks 13th in the latest Learfield Sports Directors' Cup standings on the strength of strong finishes by men's basketball, rifle, women's indoor track and field and women's basketball. Also scoring points among winter sports were men's and women's swimming and diving and men's indoor track and field.

UK currently ranks second among all 14 Southeastern Conference schools, trailing only No. 6 Florida, and leads all schools from the Bluegrass state, with Louisville coming in at No. 20.

Looking ahead, UK appears to have a good chance of maintaining its current ranking or even improving on it. UK will add points from gymnastics' finish at NCAA Regionals when standings are tabulated on April 24 and potentially even more as spring sports play out.

The women's outdoor track and field team currently checks in at No. 5 in the polls after finishing ninth at NCAA Indoor Championships, while the men are No. 24. Baseball, softball and men's tennis are all ranked in the top 15, while women's tennis is No. 28 and both golf teams are in contention for NCAA berths.

If those teams perform as well as expected, UK could be in line to meet Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart's goal of finishing in the top 15 of Directors' Cup standings by the year 2015 as part of the 15 by 15 by 15 Plan. UK has won 11 of the 15 conference or national titles needed to meet Barnhart's goal and has reached his threshold of a 3.0 department-wide grade-point average in three straight semesters.

It's also worth mentioning that UK is faring well in Capitol One Cup standings, tying for seventh in men's standings with 41 points and coming in 37th in women's standings.

All in all, 2013-14 is shaping up to be a year to remember for UK Athletics.


The Kentucky softball team tallied a 9-1 win over Wright State and a 10-0 win over Mississippi Valley State in a mid-week series that served many purposes in the midst of a grueling SEC slate.

The Wildcats easily could have overlooked the two games, sandwiched between a home series against Texas A&M and a three-game set at Ole Miss. Instead, they turned in back-to-back run-rule efforts to keep the momentum going from one conference series to the next.

"It says a lot about our team's focus," UK head coach Rachel Lawson said. "We had a certain game plan going into the two games, and each player went out there and did their job and executed what we were trying to do, so it really says a lot about their focus and their ability to keep working towards going deep in the postseason."

Kentucky had won four of its last five heading into Tuesday's game, and the focus never wavered.

UK scored 19 runs and allowed 29 base runners in eight total innings at the plate. In the circle, three Wildcat hurlers allowed one run, six hits and notched 12 strikeouts in 10 total innings.

Aside from earning a pair of wins to boost their record to 33-8, Rachel Lawson was happy to see the Wildcats work on improving parts of their game.

"I think we were working on hitting certain pitches, instead of taking them, and I think that was good," Lawson said. "Each girl knew what her job was, what her role was, and she was able to execute, so that was great. It was also nice to put some players into positions that I believe they are going to play this weekend, which they didn't get to do last weekend, just to make them a little bit more comfortable."

Another benefit of the two-game set was getting a number of underclassmen valuable playing experience. In Wednesday's contest, freshman Breanne Ray launched her first career home run.

"It was awesome," Ray said about getting the opportunity to play today. "When Coach Lawson told me I was in the lineup, I was extra excited for today. I just wanted to show my team that I had it in me."

Ray certainly had it in her to lead off the third inning. A shot to right center was the outfielder's first home run as a Wildcat and just her second career hit. 

"I couldn't stop smiling, to be honest," Ray said. "I was so happy. Then all my teammates were there to greet me, and they made me feel even better."

"She is a great hitter and we're expecting great things from her in the future," Lawson said. "The fact that she was able to sit on her pitch and drive it over the wall says a lot about how mature she is mentally. I just love how she was able to take advantage of the opportunity."

The Wildcats, now winners of four in a row and six of their last seven, look to keep the momentum going on the road when they travel to Ole Miss for a three-game set April 11-13.


Cedric Kauffmann saw how the match was playing out.

With No. 1 Ohio State in town and UK out to a 1-0 lead in doubles, he watched as Alejandro Gomez and Beck Pennington were poised for straight-set wins on courts two and three that would put the Wildcats within one point of a match win.

Kauffmann recognized there was a good chance it would all be decided by his best player, Tom Jomby.

"We had to win some third sets for us to win this match, so I told Tom, 'I think it's going to come down to you,' " Kauffmann said.

Kauffmann was right.

Jomby, the nation's No. 13 singles player, had fallen to No. 9 Peter Kobelt in the first set, but Kauffmann challenged him to hone his focus with the match potentially on the line. He won the second set, 6-3, setting up an opportunity for Jomby to win it for the Cats in the third.

He did just that, dominating the set and giving No. 14 UK (17-7, 8-2 Southeastern Conference) its fourth win over a top-ranked team in school history and first since 1997.

"They're always very, very tough to beat," Kauffmann said of Ohio State. "They're always fit. They're always well-coached, so we know it was going to take everybody in the lineup to beat Ohio State to play well."

Accordingly, UK got contributions from everywhere.

In doubles, Pennington and Gomez rallied from a 5-0 deficit to win a tiebreaker. Ryuji Hirooka and Nils Ellefsen followed with another tie-breaking win in No. 3 doubles. In singles, Gomez and Pennington finished those straight-set victories.

But as Kauffmann foretold, it came down to Jomby.

The senior is in the home stretch of his UK career. With his final regular-season home matches coming up this weekend, Kauffmann has seen a different level of focus from Jomby after a late-March lapse.

"I thought he did a really good job in January, February," Kauffmann said. "After Georgia (on March 21), I think he went away for 10 days, two weeks. Maybe a little tired. Maybe he was watching too much basketball late night. I think he bounced back tonight with his nerves a little bit so I'm very happy for him."

Jomby won't have to won't long to sustain it, as UK will host Morehead State at 7 p.m. ET on Wednesday, South Carolina on Friday and Florida and Murray State on Sunday.

"We'll take it one match at a time," Kauffmann said. "We'll take care of Morehead and then tomorrow we'll--I think physically that's going to be the most important. We're playing five matches in six days so we're going to have to take care of our bodies and all that stuff, but I told them in the locker room, 'We can beat Ohio State but we can go down to South Carolina or Florida.'

UK's win over Ohio State served notice of what the Cats are capable of, but Kauffmann doesn't want his team to forget what it looks like when they aren't in top form.

"We're for sure going to use this match in the future and I'm going to use the Alabama match also," Kauffmann said. "That's what we can do when we are not intense and not playing great and this is what we can do when we're together and playing good."


Post-practice interview with Mark Stoops



The back-and-forth between Kentucky's two units continued on Wednesday, with the offense bouncing back during what Neal Brown called a "really good, spirited" practice.

"Pretty good work today," head coach Mark Stoops said. "Good energy. Offense responded a little bit. Monday defense got after a little bit. Had good energy. Good enthusiasm. Probably had the upper hand in team drills, today the offense responded a little bit, a little more balanced."

That continues a trend that's lasted through the week and a half of spring practice with the Wildcats showcasing offseason improvement. That doesn't mean there isn't a long road ahead.

"I like what I see," Stoops said. "Guys are working hard and getting better. But like I always say, we have miles to go. But I like their attitude, their energy and their work ethic. We're improving."

Brown echoed that sentiment, singling out his linemen for praise.

"I like the energy we got, especially up front with our offensive line," Brown said. "We're starting to get some leadership up there with Jordan Swindle and Darrian Miller and Jon Toth really coming along."

In the backfield, UK got a boost with the return of Jojo Kemp and Braylon Heard. The two running backs have sat out recently with minor injuries, but were back in action on Wednesday.

"We're getting more depth at that position," Stoops said. "Mikel (Horton) is getting a bunch of work. Josh (Clemons) being back a little bit has been helpful. He's a tough physical presence in there. It's been good. We need to get a bunch of guys."

Clemons has been a particularly pleasant surprise after missing each of the last two seasons, the first while rehabbing a knee injury suffered as a freshman and the second after sustaining an Achilles tendon injury in preseason workouts.

"I can't even explain it, really," Clemons said, asked how much he's enjoying being back on the field. "I'm just happy to be back out here with the guys and getting better instead of just sitting around watching all the time."

Clemons, however, was doing more than just sitting during the time he missed, working hard in the weight room and making sure his injured knee and ankle are back at full strength. And now, looking much like the player who led UK in rushing through the first six games of his freshman year, Brown says Clemons is an example to his teammates.

"Toughness and perseverance, without question," Brown said. "He really attacked his rehab. He looks better now than any time that I've seen him."

If Clemons sustains that form, he could be a valuable piece for an offense that needs as many running backs as possible. For now, he's excited just to have the chance to compete.

"It's a lot of talent, a lot of talent," Clemons said. "We're out there competing each day, pushing each other and we're getting better as we go."

Neal Brown interview



Live blog: Men's tennis vs. No. 1 Ohio State

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Marcus Lee hugs a fan along UK's drive from the airport to Rupp Arena for Tuesday's season celebration. (Chet White, UK Athletics) Marcus Lee hugs a fan along UK's drive from the airport to Rupp Arena for Tuesday's season celebration. (Chet White, UK Athletics)
It was a lot to ask, holding a season celebration less than 24 hours after Kentucky's magical NCAA Tournament run ended.

Emotions were still raw after the Wildcats' national championship game defeat for players and fans alike, and missed opportunities from Monday night still very much top of mind.

But on Tuesday afternoon, it should come as no surprise the Big Blue Nation came through under less-than-ideal circumstances. The Wildcats, because they know what UK fans are all about, weren't surprised, but they certainly appreciated the show of support.

"You're the best fans in the world," senior Jon Hood told the crowd at the season celebration at Rupp Arena. "You supported us all year in an up-and-down year. You came out when we were playing good; you came out when we were playing bad. You supported us the whole way."

An estimated crowd of 3,500 filled Rupp Arena to pay a deserved tribute to the Cats and the season that was. The mood may not have been as jubilant as it would have had the 60-54 score of UK's game against Connecticut been reversed, but the event and the drive from the airport to downtown served as a fitting cap to a month no one will soon forget.

After UK's team plane arrived early Tuesday afternoon, the Wildcats were greeted by a crowd of well-wishers at the airport before they piled into three buses with coaches and support staff. Flanked by a police escort, the Cats went on a circuitous path to Rupp, even stopping to say hello to a large group gathered outside Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital.

The rest of the route was lined by waving and cheering fans -- an incredible number wearing UK blue -- as the team buses traded honks with passing cars.

"We made this ride from the airport to the arena two years ago and I forgot how emotional it was, people lining streets of Lexington to thank this group of basketball players," Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart said. "It reminds me how deeply tied we are to this community, to our state and to our university and how much this program means to all of you and we're indebted to you for your loyalty to us."

UK fans, to say the least, have a reputation for being demanding of their beloved Wildcats. That was never clearer than this year as Kentucky saw its season go from unbeaten aspirations to an almost-assumed first-weekend exit in the NCAA Tournament.

Instead, of course, the Cats went on that run. They upended unbeaten Wichita State. They took down rival Louisville and rode clutch performances past Michigan and Wisconsin and into the title game, though just short of a championship.

Disappointment still fresh for the Cats, the UK fans known far and wide for their championship-or-bust expectations, proved they value the heart, determination and togetherness their team showed throughout the tournament above all else.

In doing so, they may have just helped fast forward the healing process for the Cats by reminding them of exactly how special these last three weeks have been.

"I can't tell if we lost that game last night after witnessing what I am right now," Willie Cauley-Stein tweeted from the bus ride to Rupp.

John Calipari, following Barnhart in addressing the crowd from a podium erected on the Rupp floor, delivered another such reminder.

"You know these guys behind me -- because I'm going to say this from experience -- at some point they're going to be a grandfather," Calipari said. "... They're going to be a grandfather and their grandson's going to on their lap and sit on their knee and say, 'Granddad, tell me about you as a player. I heard you played.' 'Well let me tell you about my freshman year.' "

They'll have plenty to tell.

By the time Aaron Harrison is bouncing a grandchild on his knee, his three game-winners will probably have come from half-court. When Alex Poythress remembers his game-turning and-one dunk against Wisconsin, he'll probably have jumped from outside the free-throw line.

But for all the tall tales they'll tell about surviving one of the hardest roads in NCAA Tournament history, there's no way they'll be able to exaggerate the closeness that made it all possible.

"I want to thank the young men behind me who have possessed the skill, combined it with learning and listening and loving each other to create moments and memories which will last our lifetime and theirs," Barnhart said. "I want to thank you. It has been a heck of a ride and we're really, really, really proud of what you guys have done. Outstanding."

Pride, for everyone on that end-zone stage, was mixed with regret and -- maybe more than anything else -- exhaustion. Not only have the Cats played nine games in 25 days in four different cities while also managing a regular spring-semester course load, they had also had a short night of rest following the season's final game.

Tiredness, however, will fade after a couple good nights of rest. The memories, including the ones made on Tuesday in Rupp Arena and on the roads of Lexington, will not.

"While our minds and bodies -- all of us -- are tired, our hearts are still filled with love for each other and this opportunity to climb this mountain together," Calipari said. "I will tell you it's time now to reflect, celebrate and remember -- and continue to remember -- we are breaking barriers."

To bring you more expansive coverage, CoachCal.com and Cat Scratches will be joining forces for the postseason. You can read the same great stories you are accustomed to from both sites at CoachCal.com and UKathletics.com/blog, but now you'll enjoy even more coverage than normal.

Big Blue Nation stands proud after memorable season

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ARLINGTON, Texas -- It's a tough day in Big Blue Nation, but hardly one to be ashamed of. Though the season ended in disappointment Monday night, it hardly tarnished a magnificent run.

BBN was in full support of the Wildcats after their loss on Monday and into the early morning hours on Tuesday. Below are a collection of tweets of support.

Just a reminder, the team will still have its season celebration Tuesday afternoon after landing back in Lexington. Tickets are free. You can read the full details here.

                    To bring you more expansive coverage, CoachCal.com and Cat Scratches will be joining forces for the postseason. You can read the same great stories you are accustomed to from both sites at CoachCal.com and UKathletics.com/blog, but now you'll enjoy even more coverage than normal.

James Young and John Calipari. (Chet White, UK Athletics) James Young and John Calipari. (Chet White, UK Athletics)
By Annie Dunbar, CoachCal.com

ARLINGTON, Texas - The questions on their future were as predictable as this recent run has been improbable.

Is it too early to start asking about declaring for the NBA Draft?

"Yes," Aaron Harrison said, leaving it at nothing more than that.

But with Kentucky's season over and the NBA early-entry deadline now looming, the Wildcats, still dealing with a disappointing loss to Connecticut in the national championship game, were hounded with questions on their basketball future nonetheless.

All of the potential NBA players said they haven't thought that far ahead.

"I'm just focused on this game right now," Andrew Harrison said. "I want to spend these last days with my teammates and stuff before we get back to Lexington."

After they get back and the dust settles from the season, John Calipari said he will sit down with each player and figure out what they want to do.

"I'll sit down with each young man individually, probably have their family either with us or on a speakerphone, and get them information and say, 'If I can help you with anything, let me know. Tell me what you want to do, what do I need to do to help you?' " Calipari said. "I kind of stay out of the decision-making. I just get them information. So we'll see. I have no idea because I haven't talked to them and none of us have talked about that. We were playing to win the national championship."

A number of Wildcats were already predicted as potential NBA Draft picks as recently as a month ago, but the wild tournament run that brought Kentucky to the national championship game certainly boosted the draft stock for a number of players.

Looking through the roster and NBA mock drafts, there are multiple players who will have the option of moving on to the next level should they choose to do so. Returning sophomores Willie Cauley-Stein and Alex Poythress are potential draft picks after staying through a second season to develop their game. Freshmen Aaron Harrison, Andrew Harrison, Julius Randle, James Young and Dakari Johnson are all high on NBA draft boards, especially after their performances in the NCAA Tournament.

But in the immediate aftermath of the UConn loss, with eyes still puffy and tears still flowing, the Cats didn't want to talk about their futures. Randle, who is predicted to go high in the first round, said thinking about the NBA is the farthest thing from his mind.

"Right now it's just hard to think about that," Randle said. "It hurts. I haven't really thought about it yet."

Cauley-Stein, who chose to stay another year after last season's NIT appearance to compete for a national championship, said the decision comes down to more than just dollars and cents.

"The best thing that's probably ever happened to me is coming to Kentucky," Cauley-Stein said. "That whole community, that whole fan base makes you feel like you're a rock star. The kids look up to you. The old people, they look up to you. You got 40-year-old guys that you're their role model because you're 20 years old and you're like, 'How am I going to be a role model when you're 20 years older than me?' It's just amazing to see. Those fans are so powerful."

The power of the fans and the community will make him think long and hard about his decision.

"That will always being weighing in the back of your head when you're trying to make a decision whether you want to stay until you can't stay no more or you want to leave early," Cauley-Stein said. "That's kind of like how I am. Why not relish something for as long as you can until you're forced to leave or make that jump. That's the hardest thing."

One item that does not play a factor in Cauley-Stein's case is his recent ankle injury.

"It's not serious enough what's going to happen," Cauley-Stein said. "But you just don't know. Something might come up where you have to leave or something might come up where you need to stay. It's just time, you know what I'm saying? You got weeks before you really have to make your decision."

As for Aaron Harrison, the biggest factor for him is his family, and even potentially playing without his twin brother, Andrew.

"I really don't want to think about that right now," Aaron Harrison said. "I've been playing with him my whole life. It's our dream, but taking away something that's been there is taking away your oxygen."

Within the next couple of weeks, by April 27 to be exact, all of the Wildcats will be forced to decide between playing another season at UK or taking the leap to the next level by entering the NBA Draft. Calipari said that the decision ultimately comes down to what's best for the individual player.

"Now that the season's over, it is about the players," Calipari said. "It's no longer about the program. It's no longer about the team. It's about each individual player on this team now. They sacrificed. They surrendered to each other now, for our team and our program and our school. Season's over. Now it's about them. And we'll sit down with each of them and they will make decisions for themselves."

To bring you more expansive coverage, CoachCal.com and Cat Scratches will be joining forces for the postseason. You can read the same great stories you are accustomed to from both sites at CoachCal.com and UKathletics.com/blog, but now you'll enjoy even more coverage than normal.

UK's bid for a national championship fell short in a 60-54 loss to Connecticut on Monday night. (Chet White, UK Athletics) UK's bid for a national championship fell short in a 60-54 loss to Connecticut on Monday night. (Chet White, UK Athletics)
ARLINGTON, Texas -- Willie Cauley-Stein, reduced to cheering on his teammates and watching from the bench, had clearly spent some time thinking about UK's championship celebration.

He couldn't help but think about it more after the Wildcats' bid to cut the nets down in AT&T Stadium was cut short in the national title game on Monday.

"The hardest part is you want to leave on some joy," Cauley-Stein said. "You don't want to leave this tournament how we're about to leave it. It would have been so much better if we left it up on this stage swinging our shirts and wearing our hats backwards and taking goofy pictures that are going to be with us forever."

Instead, the Cats walked off the floor as the Connecticut Huskies enjoyed the celebration Cauley-Stein so vividly imagined. As if a 60-54 loss to end a remarkable NCAA Tournament run wasn't painful enough.

"It's a long walk," Aaron Harrison said. "You just get the feeling that that could have been you and you kind of want to start over but you don't get start-overs in life and you don't get second chances."

Aaron Harrison is right about not getting second chances. The Cats won't ever shake the frustration that came with the 11 free throws they missed in 24 attempts. The nightmares of the loose balls they missed out on in being outrebounded 34-33, those won't go away anytime soon.

But neither will the moments that brought UK to within one win of its ninth national title.

Those three game-winners Aaron Harrison hit in in as many games -- no matter what he may say -- they'll still be seen on March Madness highlight reels for years to come. Those four instant-classic games a group of freshmen managed to win with grit, toughness and a steadfast refusal to give in, fans will still remember them for years to come.

Still processing the fact that their season was over, the Cats went through the internal tug-of-war between the sting of a too-recent defeat and the memories built on a run for the ages.

"I'm proud of the run we made, but this isn't what we planned on," Aaron Harrison said. "I'm not really satisfied with it, but at the same time we did make one of the best runs ever and we just came together as a team like has never been seen before."

As much the Cats captured the hearts of the Big Blue Nation with the unlikeliest of Final Four berths in the program's rich history, that togetherness is what those outside the UK locker room will never quite grasp. No one could be expected to, because there are moments when not even John Calipari is able to fathom what just happened.

"I can't tell you, even in that loss, I can't believe what these guys got done together," Calipari said. "Talking about a bunch of young kids that just went out there and believed and believed in each other and just kept fighting."

They had seemingly every reason to give up a month ago after their season hit its low point with a loss to South Carolina, but they rallied around each other and an as-yet-unconfirmed "tweak" in the postseason.

The same was true as UK faced deficits of at least nine points in the Sweet 16, Elite Eight, Final Four and national title game, but the Cats simply never gave in.

"These kids really fought and tried and what they accomplished, I told them, this was the best group I've ever coached as far as really being coachable and wanting to learn," Calipari said. "I've never coached a team this young."

Shouldering the unyielding burden of unprecedented preseason expectations, there was a time when it seemed unlikely that young team of talented players would jell into a cohesive unit. Aaron Harrison credits his coach for finally turning the bond the team had always shared into on-court results.

"I think Coach taught how to play basketball together," Aaron Harrison said. "We were always close off the court. We always hung out, but just what Coach taught us, it was just amazing that he could change us around and what everyone was saying about how we were selfish and couldn't play as a team, we just proved the world wrong really."

In the process of proving the world wrong, the Cats proved themselves and their coach right. Winning at the highest level with a group of gifted freshmen is indeed possible.

"The things we did and accomplished this year is just something we're always going to remember," Julius Randle said. "I wish we could have got more game, but I'm proud of the fight that we had."

That pride, of course, was twinged with a dose of dejection.

Randle sat back in the corner of his locker, answering questions politely but barely above a whisper at times. Andrew Harrison also handled his postgame responsibilities admirably, but with his eyes still damp with tears.

His twin brother kept a stiff upper lip as he addressed reporters, only coming close to losing his composure when asked about the hardest part of the loss.

"Just seeing the seniors like Jon Hood and Jarrod (Polson) just going out like that," Aaron Harrison said.

On that count, score one against the cynics who say Coach Cal's gifted newcomers care only about themselves and their immediate futures.

"At the end of the day with no one left, we knew that this team would never be assembled again," Polson said. "We realize that this is probably one of the best groups of guys we've ever had at Kentucky and probably that anyone will ever experience again, as far as pros or wherever people might go."

Those stay-or-leave questions, however, are for another day. For now, these Cats are only thinking about each other, the run they made and what they fell just short of accomplishing.

"It's just a blessing to be a part of this team because of the way we came together," Aaron Harrison said. "We're still one of the best stories ever and on paper we had the hardest run in NCAA Tournament history. It's nothing to be ashamed of. We just wanted to win."


To bring you more expansive coverage, CoachCal.com and Cat Scratches will be joining forces for the postseason. You can read the same great stories you are accustomed to from both sites at CoachCal.com and UKathletics.com/blog, but now you'll enjoy even more coverage than normal.

Recent Comments

  • Guy Ramsey: The song is "The Mighty Rio Grande" by the band This Will Destroy You. read more
  • Griffin: What's the name of the song that this video starts playing when describing Cal getting ejected and Aaron talking about read more
  • Quinn : It was an amazing run! I hope you all return and make another stab at it. read more
  • Sandy Spears: I completely with the person's comment above. So proud of all the young men and their accomplishments. They have everything read more
  • BJ Rassam: The Cats came so close to winning another NCAA basketball championship. read more
  • chattyone: Congratulations to our Wildcats! They are terrific. All of us just like these young men are disappointed in the loss, read more
  • clint bailes: Such a great season! You guys fought hard til the end. Loved watchin the season! Can't wait til next season. read more
  • Andrea Boyd: you guys are AMAZING! as individuals and as a team. thank you for your tremendous playing and work and attitudes. read more
  • laura n: What an honor and privledge to watch all of you grow into incredible young men. Never enjoyed a season more. read more
  • Amy Carnes: Very proud of you cats you have really grow as a team .You proved all the doubters wrong. And have read more