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Willie Cauley-Stein and Kentucky will take on West Virginia on Thursday night in the Sweet 16. (Chet White, UK Athletics) Willie Cauley-Stein and Kentucky will take on West Virginia on Thursday night in the Sweet 16. (Chet White, UK Athletics)
CLEVELAND -- Kentucky vs. West Virginia. Calipari vs. Huggins. Size vs. full-court press.

Thursday's Sweet 16 matchup between the Wildcats and Mountaineers had plenty of storylines to begin with. Then West Virginia's locker room opened to the media.

"I give them their props," West Virginia's Daxter Miles told Brett Dawson of CatsIllustrated.com. "Salute them to getting to 36-0. But tomorrow they're gonna be 36-1."

The chatter would continue, with Miles - a freshman guard - not only saying "nobody is invincible," but also saying "they don't play that hard" of the Wildcats ahead of a Sweet 16 matchup. The top-seeded Cats (36-0) weren't there to hear it, but they surely heard about it soon after when their own locker room opened.

Karl-Anthony Towns mostly nodded quietly.

"I mean, everyone has an opinion," Towns said. "Just take it as you get, I guess. We've always been criticized for everything. So it's OK."

Willie Cauley-Stein, meanwhile, had a bit more vocal reaction. The player most agree to be the best defender in the country, known for his tireless energy in guarding post players and wing players alike, wasn't so sure about the play-hard critique.

"You've never even watched us play in person or you've never even watched us play people that are supposed to beat you and you end up beating them by 30, 40 points," Cauley-Stein said. "But we don't play hard? I mean--If you're playing against teams like UCLA, Kansas, that are good teams and you're able to do what we did to them without playing hard, imagine what we do playing hard. That's kind of my mentality."

Cauley-Stein has a point there.

UK has steamrolled through 36 games this season without a loss, staying atop the polls throughout and winning games by an NCAA-leading margin of 20.8 points per game. The Cats have won all five of their postseason games by double digits to boot, leading some to wonder why the Mountaineers would poke the bear that is Kentucky with anything other than respectful, boilerplate quotes.

Cauley-Stein knows better. He also doesn't mind.

"No, I expect them to say stuff like that," Cauley-Stein said. "I don't necessarily know a team that at this point wouldn't say something like that. That's good. Adds fuel to the fire. Puts a little personal stuff into it. It's all good stuff."

With an Elite Eight berth going to the winner, the stakes were already high enough, said Cauley-Stein. Now the Cats have something more to play for than just a win. Pride's on the line.

"Now I'm kind of juiced," Cauley-Stein said. "This game is going to be really fun. They made it kind of personal now."

The game, based on West Virginia's physical full-court defense and Kentucky's proven ability to deal with such a style, was already plenty compelling. With a little friendly back and forth added to the mix, CBS becomes the place to be at 9:45 p.m. on Thursday.

"It's just going to be one of them games, that I'm telling you, if you want to watch a good game, you're going to want to watch this game because dudes is lit," Cauley-Stein said. "Dudes is really ready to play."

Excited as the Cats might be to have a little fuel added to the fire, one thing is noticeably absent from any of their responses to questions about West Virginia's pregame predictions.

Trash talk of their own.

"We don't worry about that," Towns said. "You know what's the thing? It's usually always the people that are the best that say the least."

The Cats are happy to let their play speak for itself.

UK will face West Virginia in the NCAA Tournament for the third time in six years on Thursday. (Chet White, UK Athletics) UK will face West Virginia in the NCAA Tournament for the third time in six years on Thursday. (Chet White, UK Athletics)
CLEVELAND -- It may seem just like yesterday for some Big Blue faithful.

Kentucky was riding high, a No. 1 seed in the East Regional Finals looking to make it back to the Final Four for the first time since 1998. The only team standing in the way was the No. 2 seed in that region, West Virginia.

Played in a cold, wet and dreary Syracuse, N.Y., the Wildcats missed their first 20 3s against the Mountaineers, finishing just 4 of 32, and lost 73-66.

"To even be in the game 0-20, I must have had a hell of a team, which I did," UK head coach John Calipari said Wednesday.

Asked if he could take any lessons from that 2010 game, Huggins replied nonchalantly.

"If Cal promises to miss his first 20 3s like they did in 2010 that would help," he said, "if we could get him to do that."

On Thursday, Kentucky, again the No. 1 seed, will face fifth-seeded West Virginia for the third time in the last six NCAA Tournaments. While no member of either 2010 team is still playing, both schools' players have been reminded of the game.

West Virginia, being the victors that day, naturally have used the history lesson as a sense of pride and motivation.

"That's all we've been hearing all week, is the team that beat that team in 2010, but the reality is we play two different styles," West Virginia senior guard Juwan Staten said. "That team had a lot of size and they played a slower down game. But we're going to be in your face and we're going to be pressing. Ultimately that doesn't mean anything but it gives us a lot of motivation and a lot of confidence."

To put things in perspective, Harrison was just a freshman in high school at the time that game was played. UK's current freshman class was in its second semester of eight grade, preparing for the upcoming rigors of high school, and Devin Booker was just 13 years old.

Asked about it Wednesday, the Wildcats paid no mind to the game, pointing out that it was a different team entirely.

"I was probably playing basketball somewhere or doing something else while they were playing," Trey Lyles said.

"I know we didn't shoot the ball well, but other than that, that's all I really know," Aaron Harrison said about the game. "I liked DeMarcus Cousins and John Wall. I was a fan."

One current Wildcat who was watching the game was freshman forward Karl-Anthony Towns, only he was watching the Mountaineers more than the Wildcats.

"I was watching," Towns said. "Close friend of mine played for West Virginia, too. Da'Sean Butler."

Even still, with both rosters being entirely different, styles of play having changed, and much more, members of the Big Blue Nation remember the game all too well. On Coach Cal's weekly call-in show Monday, he was asked about the 2010 game before he could remind the caller that the Cats won one year later - and more recently - in the tournament.

Sometimes it's the most painful memories that linger, but the fact that the fans do remember that game and have reminded the players about it comes as no surprise to Lyles.

"I wouldn't say it surprises me, knowing Big Blue Nation and how they love basketball and stuff like that," Lyles said. "Every team was their best team so of course they're going to hold onto something like that and they just want us to beat a team, revenge them I guess."

Andrew Harrison and Tyler Ulis will face West Virginia's full-court press on Thursday. (Chet White, UK Athletics) Andrew Harrison and Tyler Ulis will face West Virginia's full-court press on Thursday. (Chet White, UK Athletics)
CLEVELAND - The theories and strategies of how to beat Kentucky have been thrown out all year dating back to August when the Wildcats were handling pro teams in the Bahamas.

You've got to spread them out, you need to hit a bunch of 3s, you need to score in transition, a physical team is one that can get the Wildcats out of their game, they said.

"They gotta run out (of strategies) eventually," junior forward Willie Cauley-Stein said prior to the Cats' round of 32 game versus Cincinnati. "They try everything. You got to though. You can't get mad at it. I would do the same thing."

Cincinnati's physical style of ball was the latest to go toe to toe with undefeated Kentucky. Like the 35 teams before the Bearcats, it proved to not be enough, though despite UK leading by 19 points with just over one minute left in the game, some believe the Bearcats actually exposed vulnerability in Kentucky.

Next up is No. 20/21 ranked and No. 5 seeded West Virginia, affectionately known as "Press Virginia" due to its full-court pressure defense applied on nearly every possession following both a made or missed basket.

The Wildcats have faced multiple teams that have applied their press to them this year, namely Louisville and Arkansas, but many believe yet again that this may be the formula to finally crack the as-of-now unbreakable Kentucky will.

"We know that they're going to play hard and it's going to be a physical game, and we have been preparing for that all weekend," freshman guard Devin Booker said.

Preparing for it and facing it are two different items, however. Against Arkansas in the SEC Tournament championship, Kentucky excelled against the Razorbacks' press, scoring 78 points and cruising to victory in the second half.

In that game, Andrew Harrison and Tyler Ulis combined for eight assists to just one turnover, and showed how effective two point guards on the floor simultaneously can be against a press.

"With two point guards in most of the game it's hard to press us," Tyler Ulis said. "(Andrew Harrison) can get the ball, I can get the ball, Aaron and Book can also handle the pressure, and Trey (Lyles). It's hard to press us, and then once we get in the open court it's lobs."

Over the last five games, the two point guards have proven to be especially effective, distributing 37 assists to just 10 turnovers (3.7 assist-to-turnover ratio). Still, West Virginia, which leads the nation in turnovers forced and steals, didn't think its press would be rendered ineffective against the Cats Thursday and that eventually it would take its toll on Kentucky physically.

"I mean, everybody that we play, their guards, they can break the press - I mean at the beginning of the first half they might be making good decisions but then they don't realize they don't have enough depth on their bench and the second half is going to catch up," West Virginia senior guard Gary Browne said. "Sometime during the game we can see it. We get real excited when things like that happen. I feel like the whole bench, the whole team can realize that and that's when we know, we go harder and more aggressive."

Browne's senior backcourt mate Juwan Staten echoed his sentiments on wearing the opponent down, saying the Mountaineers were the best conditioned team in the country, and used West Virginia's tough, physical practices as an example.

"Why wouldn't it (work)?" Staten said. "We've been playing this way all year, we've had success against everybody no matter what style or what type of players they have. That's the only way we play and it's just up to us to make it work."

Similar to its bordering state to the east, Kentucky has worn teams down all season as well, typically occurring midway to late in the second half, as evidenced in gritty road wins at Florida, LSU and Georgia, as well as Saturday's third-round NCAA Tournament victory over Cincinnati. Kentucky has also talked about the excitement of seeing the opposition begin to wither under fatigue.

"It will be different because we have nine guys (Coach Cal) plays, rotating in and out, two point guards, a lot of people who can handle the ball so that's going to be a little bit different with the rotation and stuff like that," Ulis said.

Another advantage for Kentucky in attacking West Virginia's press will be the Wildcats' size. Kentucky's starting lineup stands at 6-foot-6, 6-6, 6-10, 6-11 and 7-0. The Cats also have three players coming off the bench standing at 6-6, 6-9 and 7-0. By comparison, West Virginia's starters are 6-1, 6-1, 6-3, 6-7 and 6-9.

"I don't know what you do about that," West Virginia head coach Bob Huggins said. "I've thought about that, but I haven't really come up with an answer."

"Sometimes you can't dribble around the press, so it's good for them to be able to pick it up and look over defenders, step through presses and stuff like that," Ulis said.

One seemingly distinct advantage of the press for Kentucky is that it speeds up the game and the Wildcats have flourished in fast-paced games. Of the seven games Kentucky has played ending in regulation that have featured 70 or more possessions, the Wildcats have outscored their opponents by 34.0 points per game. West Virginia, for its part, has played in 13 such games and has the 29th-fastest adjusted tempo in the country, according to KenPom.com.

"I think we enjoy just playing, period," Aaron Harrison said. "In fast-paced games - yeah, I do think we enjoy fast-paced games."

Now, West Virginia's method of answering the question that no team has been able to answer will be put to the test. How do you beat Kentucky? The Mountaineers say it's all about their press, and Coach Cal says they won't stray away from that Thursday.

"I said what (Huggins has) done with this team, incredible," Calipari said. "And again, he's taken kids, they've gotten better individually and they've come together and say here's the style we can win with, and that's how they're playing and they won't get away from it, that's who they are. The players now have taken great pride in it."

John Calipari leads Kentucky into a Sweet 16 matchup with Bob Huggins' West Virginia team on Thursday. (Chet White, UK Athletics) John Calipari leads Kentucky into a Sweet 16 matchup with Bob Huggins' West Virginia team on Thursday. (Chet White, UK Athletics)
CLEVELAND - Bob Huggins owed one to John Calipari.

The two coaches share a close bond, so after Calipari came to a fundraiser for the cancer center at West Virginia, Huggins had to repay the favor when Calipari asked him to speak at a clinic in Kentucky.

Huggins went in blind, knowing only that plenty of UK fans would be in attendance. So consider his surprise when he asked Calipari what he should discuss with the crowd.

"He says, '1-3-1, everybody wants to know how to beat the 1-3-1,' " Huggins said. " 'They know I didn't figure it out so they want everybody to do it.' "

It hadn't been long since West Virginia's quirky zone defense had flummoxed UK into 4-of-32 3-point shooting and an Elite Eight loss in 2010 and the wounds were still fairly fresh. Calipari just didn't much care.

"You've got to have a lot of self-assurance to, you know, bring somebody in to talk about a 1-3-1," Huggins said. "... But that's Cal. He's been a very dear friend."

The two dear friends will match wits again on Thursday at approximately 9:45 p.m. in Cleveland's Quicken Loans Arena. Top-seeded Kentucky carries a perfect 36-0 mark into the Sweet 16, while Huggins' fifth-seeded Mountaineers (25-9) are an overachieving bunch that, per usual, match the character of their coach.

"I've always respected what he does coaching his basketball teams, how hard they play, how physical they play, how they rebound," Calipari said.

Huggins had similar respect for Calipari as a coach, praising the work he's done to shape a group of young, talented players into the best defensive team in the country, but it's the man he's gotten to know away from the court Huggins really respects.

"He's more than a basketball coach," Huggins said. "Somebody asked me what separates Cal from other coaches, and Cal and I have gone to Europe together and done a bunch of things. And I say, well, most other basketball coaches aren't getting on a plane and read U.S. News and World Report or Money Magazine or those kind of things. Cal is a very diverse guy and I think he's kept things, I think, in a very good perspective. He's a great family guy, just, and he's been a good friend."

It's a friendship that started years ago.

Huggins says the two were introduced while he was a player at West Virginia and Calipari in high school, while Calipari says it was a few years later when Huggins had recently been named head coach at Walsh College. Regardless which is true, they've grown close over the years, sharing similar backgrounds - Calipari grew up in Moon Township, Pa., less than 80 miles from Huggins' hometown of Morgantown, W.Va. - and have moved through the coaching ranks since.

Over the course of their careers, Huggins has an 8-2 record against Calipari, the best of any coach who has faced him at least three times. Seven of Huggins' wins came while Calipari was at Memphis or UMass.

That history has become a part of regular conversation between Calipari and Huggins, and it's even spread to extended families, as evidenced by the pair's favorite story.

It was in 2002. Huggins was at the Pittsburgh airport when he started to sweat and experienced shortness of breath. An ambulance arrived to take him to the hospital and Huggins was in and out of consciousness as he had a heart attack. At one point when he came to, the paramedic tending to him revealed why he was taking such good care of Huggins.

"So I came to and I was fairly coherent at that time and he said, 'Coach, listen, I can't let you die, I'm John Calipari's cousin, and you can't die until we beat you at least once,' " Huggins said.

Huggins would of course live and return to coaching, and Calipari has gotten two wins against him, including one in the 2011 NCAA Tournament to avenge that 2010 defeat. But come Thursday evening, that's irrelevant.

"When you're playing in these games, none of the past matters," Calipari said. "Whether I was 12-0 against a coach, it doesn't matter, this is a one-game shot."

Aaron Harrison, Trey Lyles, Andrew Harrison

Willie Cauley-Stein, Karl-Anthony Towns, Dakari Johnson

In a calendar week plagued by injuries for former Cats in the NBA, Terrence Jones suffered a partially collapsed lung nine minutes into a 118-108 Houston Rockets win over the Denver Nuggets on March 19. Jones is scheduled for re-evaluation on March 27, but is expected to miss at least the next three Houston contests. Three other UK alumni-- Anthony Davis, DeMarcus Cousins, and Enes Kanter-- ended the seven-day span on the sideline with minor injuries, but were each poised for a return to action once the week was over.

Performance of the week

Nerlens Noel | Philadelphia 76ers: 97, New York Knicks: 81 | March 20, 2015
In the second of back-to-back Sixers wins (and Philly's 17th victory of 2014-15), Noel guided his team with 23 points, 14 rebounds, five steals, and three blocks on the day. The 20-year-old's historic numbers have moved him into serious contention for the NBA's Rookie of the Year Award with under a month remaining in the regular season.


Cats in the spotlight


Eric Bledsoe | #2 PG | Phoenix Suns (37-33)
In three straight Phoenix wins, Bledsoe ignited the Suns on both ends of the floor. Starting out the week with 21 points, 11 assists, nine rebounds and two steals in a 102-89 victory over the Knicks, Bledsoe capped off the winning streak with a career-high 34 points, eight rebounds, four assists, three steals and a block in a 117-102 win over the Rockets.

DeMarcus Cousins | #15 C | Sacramento Kings (23-45)
Before missing Wednesday and Friday with a strained right calf, Cousins notched a 20-point, 13-rebound double-double (complemented by five assists, three blocks and two steals) in a 110-103 loss to the Atlanta Hawks on March 16. The defeat was the third installment in a four-game Sacramento losing streak.

Anthony Davis | #23 PF | New Orleans Pelicans (37-32)
Before missing games on Thursday and Friday with a sprained left ankle suffered during Thursday's shootaround, Davis dominated his first two games of the week in one Pelicans win and one loss. "The Brow" tallied 36 points, 14 rebounds, nine blocks, seven assists and one steal in a 118-111 double-overtime loss to the Nuggets on March 15. Two days later, Davis recorded 20 points, 12 rebounds, four assists, three blocks and a steal in an 85-84 win over the Milwaukee Bucks.

Archie Goodwin | #20 SG | Phoenix Suns (37-33)
After filling the box score with seven points, five assists, four rebounds, and three steals in the Suns' win over the Knicks on March 15, Goodwin averaged 10.5 points (6.5 more than his season average) over the next two Phoenix wins. A reverse alley-oop jam by way of Suns teammate Gerald Green earned the Arkansas native NBA.com's Dunk of the Night honors on March 19.

Enes Kanter | #34 C | Oklahoma City Thunder (39-30)
Prior to sitting out Friday's contest with the Hawks due to a sprained left ankle, Kanter posted three straight double-doubles to begin the week. Kanter averaged 19.7 points and 13.7 points over the span, leading OKC to a 2-1 record.

John Wall | #2 PG | Washington Wizards (40-29)
Thanks to two double-double performances from Wall over a three-game stretch, the Wizards finished last week with a home win over the Portland Trail Blazers, a road win over the Utah Jazz, and a loss to the Los Angeles Clippers in LA. Over the span, Wall averaged 21.3 points, 9.0 assists and 8.0 rebounds.

Brandon Knight scored 30 points in UK's round-of-32 win over West Virginia in 2011. (Chet White, UK Athletics) Brandon Knight scored 30 points in UK's round-of-32 win over West Virginia in 2011. (Chet White, UK Athletics)
Kentucky and West Virginia haven't met in the regular season since 2008. They haven't met at one of the two schools' campuses since 1992.

On Thursday night, they'll meet in the NCAA Tournament for the third time in six years.

It's odd that it's worked out that way, but perhaps it's also quite predictable at the same time due to the two teams' close proximity, their recent history of close games and head coaches' friendship.

"Cal called me about three weeks ago and said, 'You know they're going to put us in the same bracket don't you?' " West Virginia head coach Bob Huggins said following his team's 69-59 third-round victory over Maryland on Sunday night.

It's not the first time Coach Cal has been correct about potential matchups in the NCAA Tournament. Following the reveal of the NCAA Tournament bracket March 15, Calipari said it's usually a waste of time to look too far ahead in the tournament because the team you think may advance ends up losing.

He did happen to mention one team in particular, though.

"Let me just tell you, West Virginia - Bob Huggins - probably got more out of their team than any team in the country and here they are," Calipari said. "You win a couple of games and you may be facing them."

If recent history is any indicator, Thursday's Midwest Regional semifinal should be one to remember.

The two teams' meeting in 2010 is one all Kentucky fans wish they didn't remember.

UK, the No. 1 seed in the East Regional, met the No. 2 seed West Virginia with a trip to the Final Four on the line. UK went 10 for 20 on two-point field goals in the first half, but 0 for 8 from beyond the arc. Conversely, West Virginia went 8 for 15 from beyond the arc and 0 for 16 on two-point field goals. The 3-point shooting woes continued in the second half for UK as the Cats missed their first 20 3-point attempts in the game and finished just 4 for 32 in a 73-66 loss.

One year later, Kentucky topped West Virginia 71-63 in Tampa, Fla., to advance to the Sweet 16. In that game, West Virginia closed out the first half on a 22-7 run to lead by eight points, but UK scored the first 11 points of the second half and got a career-high 30 from star freshman Brandon Knight, who also sealed the game at the foul line by making six free throws in the final minute.

"We know now they beat us in 2010, we beat them pretty good in 2011," Coach Cal said. "It's always a good game."

Those two meetings will surely be one of the main storylines entering Thursday's Sweet 16 showdown. The other will be Huggins' 8-2 career record versus Calipari, which Huggins said Sunday he can't explain.

"I've got great respect for him and for what he's done and what he's been able to accomplish," Huggins said. "So, like I said, he'll have them ready. He always has them ready."

The Wildcats must be ready for a physical affair in which ball security will be of the utmost importance. West Virginia, which has committed the most fouls in the country, plays an up-and-down style and loves to press the ball, earning it the nickname "Press Virginia." The Mountaineers' adjusted tempo is the 29th fastest in the country, according to KenPom.com, and its turnover and steal percentages are tops nationally.

After playing in the rugged Big 12 Conference, which earned a nation-leading seven bids to the Big Dance, West Virginia said it would not be intimidated Thursday.

"I mean, I wish I could sit here and tell you we're definitely going to win," said Huggins, whose team also owns wins over fellow Sweet 16 teams North Carolina State and Oklahoma. "I can't do that. But I can tell you that we're not going to be scared."

"It's another team," Mountaineers forward Devin Williams said. "They put their drawers on the same way we do. So that's pretty much it. We've just got to prepare, and get our minds right."

Jennifer O'Neill had 16 points, six rebounds and five steals in UK's NCAA Tournament loss to Dayton on Sunday. (Britney Howard, UK Athletics) Jennifer O'Neill had 16 points, six rebounds and five steals in UK's NCAA Tournament loss to Dayton on Sunday. (Britney Howard, UK Athletics)
It wasn't supposed to end this way, not for the winningest senior class in school history.

Kentucky was supposed to make a deep run in the NCAA Tournament and send Bria Goss, Jennifer O'Neill, Jelleah Sidney and Azia Bishop off in style.

It wouldn't happen that way.

"A disappointing end to a season that I will always remember," Matthew Mitchell said.

Instead of moving on to Albany, N.Y., and a possible Sweet 16 matchup with rival Louisville, the Wildcats (24-10) saw their season end on their home floor with a 99-94 loss to Dayton. The seventh-seeded Flyers built an early nine-point lead, but UK battled back to go up five with less than nine minutes remaining behind Makayla Epps, who scored 29 points.

From there it was a seesaw battle, with Dayton burying a pair of 3-pointers in the final 1:08. The shots by Kelley Austria and Amber Deane both broke ties, with Deane's serving as the go-ahead basket. It came with the shot clock running down and O'Neill guarding her with 24 seconds remaining.

"Personally it's tough for me just because I'm the one that really lost the game," O'Neill said. "I let her hit that 3-point shot. That's deflating to my team. We were on a little run and as a senior I can't make mistakes like that."

Of course, O'Neill - who scored 16 points - was far from the only player who played a role in the defeat. Dayton shot 56.6 percent from the field and 11 of 18 from 3-point range, numbers that ballooned to 64 percent and 5 of 8 after halftime.

The defense that's locked down over the last three weeks returned to the form that appeared too often prior to a meeting the four seniors called with Mitchell on Feb. 24.

"It's just plagued us all year: inconsistency at inopportune moments," Mitchell said. "I could really kind of tell it from the beginning. There's just certain things that you can notice from players and we just did not have the focus and the energy and the effort that we needed."

The lack of energy ultimately spelled the end for those seniors. Goss and O'Neill appeared alongside Mitchell at the postgame press conference visibly emotional and Goss had trouble composing herself when asked about playing her final game.

"It's just going to be tough," Goss said before taking a long pause and asking for the next question.

Bishop did not play in the game, serving a one-game suspension for a "failure to uphold team standards" on Friday night related to the team's 11 p.m. curfew.

"I hate that that was the way her career ended," Mitchell said. "I really wanted to get to next week because I know she feels terrible about the situation. I feel terrible about the situation. But if you're in my shoes, you must do the right thing or if you don't have integrity you don't really have a program."

With Bishop, UK's top post presence, sidelined, the Cats were outrebounded 42-34. Mitchell didn't know whether her presence would have changed the outcome, but that doesn't much matter to him.

"I can tell you," Mitchell said, "if she'd played and whether we'd lost or won the game, I think we'd have lost a bunch in the future if I don't uphold the standard."

What makes that so difficult is Bishop and her fellow seniors were the ones who helped reestablish that standard in calling that meeting and lifting UK to a No. 2 seed in the NCAA Tournament. They won't get to be there as the Cats look to build on that foundation next season, but the role they played won't be forgotten.

"A disappointing end to a season that I will always remember," Mitchell said. "And I'm real grateful to our seniors. They had a great career here and what they did for us down the stretch to help us know what we need to know what we need to do going forward I'll always remember."

Recent Comments

  • Varie Gibson: These guys and the rest of the Kentucky Wildcats are so talented and humble. I cannot wait to see them read more
  • Bob: I do not see an repeat of the close game last year.I think the Cats win by 8 in an read more
  • Carolyn: Great game! Would have loved to been there at the game-awesome read more
  • mm: The perfect storm , that's what our boys were up against.you had a blow out game against WV doubling the read more
  • Doc Savage: Notre Dame was a team most thought UK would blow away because of superior size; depth; and rugged defense. That read more
  • Frank: Why did you not include Tyler Ulis 3 point shot? read more
  • Jack: Great highlights!!! Love Tom doing the play-by-play read more
  • S Kelly: Would like to have seen the 3 by Ulis in these highlights...great game!! read more
  • Srinivas: We gave Notre dame more credit than what they deserved by some poor passing of the ball. We started playing read more
  • Karen: That call was so awesome...thank you! read more